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Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Liao Shen-bai, Toward a Basic Mutual Understanding between Confucian and Aristotelian Virtue Ethics
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It is important for philosophers to find out positive approaches for increasing mutual understanding on those fundamental questions in both the Confucian and Aristotelian traditions of doing virtue ethics. The Aristotelian concept of the good and the Confucian concept of dao pose a question about the way human beings see the final principle of ethics. Staying within the realm of human life, Confucius develops two co-related perspectives of seeing the dao of human being. The first perspective sees the dao as standing for the ultimate truth and goodness for human beings. Setting aside the Aristotelian metaphysics of nous, this conception does not stand that far removed from Aristotle’s view of the good. The second perspective sees the dao as the right way for individuals to start. This notion seems far from Aristotle’s view of right choice. The reason is that Confucius’s manner of comprehension embraces both understanding and insight, while that of Aristotle focuses solely on understanding. But Aristotle’s concept of right choice is, in some indirect way, related to Confucius’s view of the right way. For both Confucius and Aristotle, the right way refers to our initiating acting on something connected to the end with no more thinking.
2. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Gina Vega, Volkswagen: Business as Usual
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This paper describes the general disregard for relationships that leads to unethical behavior in business as well as in one’s personal life, using an illustration from 4,000 years ago and from today. Volkswagen has been characterized as just one more example of ethical violations that lead to long-lasting environmental, financial, and personal impacts. The story of Jacob’s life reflects the origin of this type of ethical behavior and stands in parallel to the eighty-year history of the Volkswagen corporation.
3. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Mark S. Schwartz, W. Michael Hoffman, Ethical Decision Making Surveyed through the Lens of Moral Imagination
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This paper attempts to build on the contribution to moral imagination theory by Patricia Werhane by further integrating moral imagination with new theoretical developments that have taken place in the business ethics field. To accomplish this objective, part one will review the concept of moral imagination, from its definitional origins to its full theoretical conceptualization. Part two will provide a brief literature review of how moral imagination has been applied in empirical research. Part three will analyze and apply the construct of moral imagination as it relates to the key process stages of ethical decision making including awareness, judgment, intention, and behavior. Immoral imagination is then discussed, along with other behavioral ethics concepts as they relate to moral imagination. The paper concludes with potential future research directions, as well as teaching and managerial implications for the moral imagination construct.
4. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Edward J. Romar, Anthony Graybosch, The Dao of Business
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Using Daoism expressed by Chuang Tzu and the Confucianism in The Analects, The Great Learning, and the Mencius, this paper compares and contrasts Daoism and Confucianism as business ethics. In addition, it applies Daoism and Confucianism to several business cases.
5. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Stephen Kershnar, Shareholder Theory in Academia
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The managers of colleges and universities have to make decisions on a wide range of issues with regard to goals and how they may be pursued. “Managers” refers to such positions as the president, provost, vice president dean, and director of a university. This paper lays out the theoretical basis for the right answer for these decisions. It does so by setting out the fundamental function of an academic institution, linking this function to a duty, and explaining how to satisfy this duty in hard cases. This article’s thesis is that university managers have a duty to shareholders alone. Shareholders are those who own the university. This duty is satisfied when managers satisfy the fundamental project shareholders assign to a university.
6. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Robert J. Baum, 1941-2016
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7. Business and Professional Ethics Journal: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Notes on Contributors
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