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st. augustine lecture 2019
1. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Margaret R. Miles St. Augustine’s Tears: Recollecting and Reconsidering a Life
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In St. Augustine’s society, men’s tears were not considered a sign of weakness, but an expression of strong feeling. Tears might be occasional, prompted by incidents such as those Augustine described in the first books of his Confessiones. Or they might accompany a deep crisis, such as his experience of conversion. Possidius, Augustine’s contemporary biographer, reported that on his deathbed Augustine wept copiously and continuously. This essay endeavors to understand those tears, finding, primarily but not exclusively in Augustine’s later writings, descriptions of his practice of meditation suggesting that a profound and complex range of emotions from fear and repentance to gratitude, love, rest in beauty, and delight in praise richly informed Augustine’s last tears.
articles
2. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Han-luen Kantzer Komline Always Something New out of Africa: Augustine’s Unapologetic Argument from Antiquity
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This paper explores changing attitudes toward novelty in early Christianity by focusing on a case study: Augustine of Hippo. It demonstrates that Augustine develops an unapologetically Christian version of the argument from antiquity, unapologetically Christian in that he redefines the very meaning of antiquity in terms of proximity to Christ and in that he relocates the argument from antiquity from the realm of apologetics, where it had become a stock weapon in the arsenal of his predecessors, to the realm of intramural Christian debate. In the process, Augustine relativized temporal measures of “novelty” and “antiquity” and recalibrated the meaning of these terms theologically, with reference to Christ.
3. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Amanda C. Knight The Shattered Soul: Augustine on Psychological Number, Order, and Weight
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This article argues that Augustine’s understanding of the internal dynamics of number, order, and weight as they pertain to corporeal creatures supplies the basis for an analogy which characterizes the process of the soul’s reformation. In other words, Augustine understands the soul’s simplicity in an analogous manner to the simplicity of corporeal creatures, and the simplicity of corporeal creatures is determined by the relations between number, order, and weight. This analogy shows that Augustine conceives of the soul as a composite entity with different loves as its constituent parts. In the process of reformation, the soul acquires an ordered disposition as those loves become more like one another. By virtue of this ordered disposition, the soul also acquires a greater degree of integration or number because the likeness of weight among its constituent parts allows the soul to move as a unity toward God as its final end.
book reviews and books received
4. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Zachary Thomas Settle Augustine, Michael P. Foley (ed.), Against the Academics: St. Augustine’s Cassiciacum Dialogues, Volume 1
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5. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Kevin L. Hughes Augustine, The City of God (de civitate Dei): Abridged Study Edition. Introduction and Translation by William Babcock
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6. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Maurice Lee William T. Cavanaugh and James K. A. Smith, editors, Evolution and the Fall
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7. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
William T. Cavanaugh Mark Clavier, On Consumer Culture, Identity, the Church, and the Rhetorics of Delight
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8. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Adam Ployd Michel Fédou, SJ, The Fathers of the Church in Christian Theology. Trans. Peggy Manning Meyer
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9. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Phillip Cary Ron Haflidson, On Solitude, Conscience, Love, and our Inner and Outer Lives
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10. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Susan Ashbrook Harvey Carol Harrison, On Music, Sense, Affect and Voice
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11. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Christina M. Carlson Nick Holder, The Friaries of Medieval London from Foundation to Dissolution
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12. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Nathaniel Grimes D. Stephen Long, Augustinian and Ecclesial Christian Ethics: On Loving Enemies
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13. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Veronica Roberts Ogle John Rist, On Ethics, Politics and Psychology in the Twenty-First Century
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14. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
James K. Lee Joseph Torchia, O.P., Creation and Contingency in Early Patristic Thought: The Beginning of All Things
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15. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 51 > Issue: 2
Books Received
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