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Displaying: 1-10 of 1027 documents


articles
1. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Anne-Isabelle Bouton-Touboulic Body Language in Augustine’s Confessiones and De doctrina christiana
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This article examines the role of bodily expressions within Augustine’s theory of signs and language. Philosophical reflection, rhetorical practice, and his own homiletical experience all led Augustine to consider the role played by the body in communicative acts. The invesitgation is sharpened via careful analysis of the rhetorical category of actio and close readings of particular passages that are relevant for Augustine’s understanding of the process of learning language in general and of learning the catechism in particular. The centrality of bodiy signs for the dramatization of the famous scene of Augustine’s conversion in the Milanese garden is also discussed: here, voice and physiognomy express the tragedy of the will, even as bodily signs (taken as natural signs) prove crucial to Augustine’s particular retelling of the story.
2. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Adam Ployd Non poena sed causa: Augustine’s Anti-Donatist Rhetoric of Martyrdom
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This article examines Augustine’s anti-Donatist claim that it is not the punishment but the cause (non poena sed causa) that makes a martyr. Augustine’s non poena sed causa argument arises as part of the larger rhetoric of martyrdom that recent scholarship has highlighted in late antiquity. I argue here that a more specific look at classical rhetorical techniques can provide a better understanding of what Augustine is up to in his particular rhetoric of martyrdom. To that end, after providing an overview of North African martyr discourse, I turn to forensic rhetoric and issue theory as described in Cicero and Quintilian. I show that two types of forensic arguments—one on the issue of definition and other on the contested interpretation of a legal text—shaped Augustine’s non poena sed causa approach to the Donatists’ claims to be the church of the martyrs.
3. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Rachel Early Love of Neighbor by Way of the Temporal Dispensation in St. Augustine
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This article takes as its point of departure the episode from Confessiones 4 in which a mature Augustine questions his earlier distraught reaction to the death of a friend. In order to place Augustine’s account of this episode within a broader context, I discuss, in the first part of the article, Augustine’s teaching on love of neighbor in De doctrina christiana. The second part of the article proposes an analogy between Augustine’s views of how one ought to be related to one’s neighbor, and his views of how one ought to be related to the sacraments, and particularly to the Eucharist. By seeking to reconcile Augustine’s treatment of how we ought to love our neighbors with his treatment of the Eucharist, and of the Eschaton, I suggest how the reader might understand love of neighbor in Augustine’s thought as having both a temporary aspect and a lasting aspect.
4. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Justin Shaun Coyle Taking Laughter Seriously in Augustine’s Confessions
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This essay analyzes the subtle theology of laughter that is scattered across Augustine’s Confessiones (conf.). First, I draw on Sarah Byers’s work in order to argue that Augustine adopts and adapts Stoic moral psychology as a means of sorting the laugh into two moral kinds—as evidence of either good joy or bad joy. In turn, these two kinds provide the loose structure for the double theological taxonomy of merciless and merciful laughter that conf. develops. Next, I treat laughter of each sort via exegesis of several textual vignettes. Close readings of key passages show that both merciless and merciful laughter evince distinctive features across Augustine’s conf. This also reveals exactly how Augustine embeds laughter’s double taxonomy in order to confect his own salvation narrative. Thus, on the reading offered here, laughter proves central to the salvation history that Augustine’s conf. weaves. We learn a good deal about Augustine’s story and his theology by attending to the subject, object, and character of laughter that may be found in his conf.
book reviews and books received
5. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Richard R. Ring David F. Appleby and Teresa Olsen Pierre, editors. On the Shoulders of Giants: Essays in Honor of Glenn W. Olsen
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6. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Scott Bailey Augustine’s Confessions: iOS version 1.5.3
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7. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Jay R. Elliott Craig G. Bartholomew and Michael W. Goheen, Christian Philosophy: A Systematic and Narrative Introduction
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8. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Eric Plumer Mark Glen Bilby, As the Bandit Will I Confess You: Luke 23, 39–43 in Early Christian Interpretation
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9. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Kari Kloos Gerald P. Boersma, Augustine’s Early Theology of Image: A Study in the Development of Pro-Nicene Theology
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10. Augustinian Studies: Volume > 49 > Issue: 1
Laela Zwollo C. H. M. Bouwman, Mater Sapientia: The Mystagogical Function of the Motherhood of God and Spiritual Motherhood in Augustine
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