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Augustinianum

Volume 63, Issue 2, December 2023

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dissertationes

1. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Enrico Norelli

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In the first part of this paper, published in issue 1 of Augustinianum 63 (2023), 9-45, we examined the question of whether Irenaeus of Lyons depended on the Exposition of Logia about the Lord of Papias of Hierapolis. In this second and final part we focus on the way Irenaeus used information which, since the first decades of the second century, had been attributed to presbyters of Asia and then in particular on the way he identifies the succession of presbyters with that of bishops (primarily in Rome). He links the latter with Christian origins but also profoundly alters the function traditionally attributed to the presbyters themselves, within a system he devised in order to respond to urgent problems, in a context quite different from the era in which the traditions to which he appeals were born.
2. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Guillermo J. Cano Gómez

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The letter from Arius to Alexander of Alexandria, also known as «Arius’ profession of faith», has been transmitted in its original language, Greek, by Athanasius (De Synodis) and Epiphanius (Panarion). Also, Hilary of Poitiers quotes a Latin translation of the letter twice (De Trinitate IV and VI). The comparative study of the two Greek versions and the Latin translation reveals small textual variants, which points to the independence of the three testimonies. The textual variant (κτιστὴν, instead of κριτὴν) is the most interesting; it comes from a Greek version that has not been preserved. However, our work has been able to reconstruct this lost textual variant using an ancient and forgotten conjecture of Erich Klostermann.
3. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Angelo Segneri Orcid-ID

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Among Basil’s homiliae morales, a prominent place is occupied by the 15 sermons on the Psalter that have been preserved. The present study, as part of the editorial project of these homilies on behalf of the Sources Chrétiennes, seeks to shed light on a phenomenon that may have affected the texts of the Cappadocian, similar to what happened with some of Augustine’s Enarrationes. In fact, the collation of some ancient witnesses of the Basilian homilies, ignored by Garnier and thus by the vulgata edition reprinted in PG 29, seems to suggest an early oral circulation of the discourse, identifiable through some textual traces, such as anacolutes, omissions of articles or explanatory parts, stylistically inelegant sentence structures, scriptural quotations not standardized according to the most widely used textual form, etc. The considerable contamination of the manuscript tradition makes it impossible to sketch a stemma that would allow the precise positioning of the individual codices reviewed. Nevertheless, the textual data collected by Bas., hom. in ps. 32, 33, 44 and 48, and presented here only in small part, have revealed the existence of two recensions: Ω1 and Ω2, where Ω2 represents the revised and corrected text after the death of Cappadoce, while the few surviving testimonies of Ω1, which represent a textus rudior, without stylistic revision and circulated without the author’s control, somehow hint at an echo, perhaps distant but in our opinion undeniable, of the oral language, i.e., of the original character of the works of this genre.
4. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Nikolay Antonov

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This article examines how Gregory of Nazianzus (Gregory the Theologian, ca. 330-390) constructs an image of the priest using political metaphor and vocabulary from previous traditions. The author chooses a specific text from ancient political thought that was close to his own understanding of Christian tradition (Plato’s Republic). In turn, the biblical material he uses comprises fragments that are highly political in nature (for example, criticism of the rulers of Israel by the prophets). Combining these texts first of all leads to their transformation, and secondly allows him to piece together an image of the priest as ruler of the Church. The combination of these two traditions makes it possible to describe both the historical and contemporary legitimization of this image – one novel for Late Antiquity – and to define the main characteristics of its ethos.
5. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Anna Delle Foglie

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This article studies an illuminated manuscript of St. Augustine’s Enarrationes in Psalmos: Vat. lat. 451 (Città del Vaticano, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana). The manuscript was commissioned by the bishop Giovanni Capogallo, when he was in Lombardy in close contact with the court of the duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti. The article examines the cultural milieu of Pavia in the early 15th century, highlighting the role of the Order of the Hermits of Saint Augustine in the monastery of San Pietro in Ciel d’Oro. The two incipit pages ff. 1r and 239r, illuminated by Michelino da Besozzo, are an example of the International Gothic style and this article analyses not only their stylistic aspect, but also their allegorical meaning, as an interesting case of decoration of a patristic text.
6. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Rossana Barcellona

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The article considers three episcopal assemblies held in Gaul, which the manuscript tradition has not preserved, all involved in doctrinal debates on grace and free will. The first two, the council of Arles and the synod of Lyon, took place in the second half of the fifth century and concerned the affair of the presbyter Lucidus. The third is the Council of Valence that met just before the Second Council of Orange (529), that is, the council that marks the “resolution” of the conflict and also the only documented. With the idea that the history of the councils occupies important points in the reconstruction of the debate on grace and free will, even in the case of councils whose acts have not been transmitted, the article seeks to enhance these three events by reconsidering indirect sources. The episcopal meetings of Arles, Lyon, and Valence are, indeed, an integral part of the doctrinal work on grace and free will, which for about a century interested monastic and ecclesiastical circles in Gaul. Moreover, the recovery of their history restores well the complexity of the cultural, religious and political climate in which they took place.
7. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Roberta Franchi

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Christians of the fourth and fifth centuries adopted Late Antique aesthetics, characterized by brilliance, dazzle and colors, to create a new form of imagination, where the corpses of the martyrs and their physical remains became shining bodies. Relics became a spiritual body, whose μετάληψις often produced roses or violets. Therefore there was a strict association in Late Antique Christianity among roses, relics and the colour red.

recensiones

8. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Tiziano F. Ottobrini

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9. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Paola Marone

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10. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Massimo Gargiulo

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11. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Gianmario Cattaneo

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12. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Carlo dell’Osso

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13. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Giovanna Martino Piccolino

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14. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Juan Antonio Cabrera Montero

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15. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Giovanni Maria Vian

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16. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Gianmario Cattaneo

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17. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Maurizio Girolami

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18. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2
Giovanni Maria Vian

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19. Augustinianum: Volume > 63 > Issue: 2

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