Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-14 of 14 documents


articles
1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Norman Brian Cubbage Nothingness and the Quarrel Between Faith and Reason
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In this paper, I examine the extent to which philosophical and theological debates concerning the concept of nothingness have shaped the contours of the debate between faith and reason in modern times. First, I argue that Parmenides, the most famous contributor to the question of nothingness, bequeaths conclusions to the tradition that are more ambivalent than usually recognized. Second, I show that nothingness re-enters philosophical debate in the West due to the role the notion plays in the Trinitarian debate in the early Christian church. Third, I argue that Descartes’s method of radical doubt and assertion of the existence of his own ego provide the contours of a response to the question of nothingness that is characteristic of modern thought. I conclude by gesturing towards a constructive proposal of my own.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Achim Oberst Heidegger’s Appropriation of Aristotle’s Δύναμισ/Ἐνέργεια Distinction
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Two of Heidegger’s most fundamental distinctions, authenticity and inauthenticity, the existential and the existentiell, are motivated by Aristotle’s δύναμισ/ένέργεια distinction. Even the basic concept of truth must be understood in terms of δύναμισj and ένέργεια. Moreover, Heidegger’s existential imperative only becomes fully comprehensible within the Aristotelian context, revealing the intrinsic interrelation of Heidegger’s two distinctions with one another.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
John Panteleimon Manoussakis The Phenomenon of God: From Husserl to Marion
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This essay is an attempt towards a phenomenology of God. The leading question in our analysis will be whether God could be given to consciousness as a phenomenon. First, we go back to Husserl and to his formulation of the possibility of phenomenality. Then, the discussion proceeds to the innovative reappropriation of Husserlian phenomenology by Jean-Luc Marion and his notion of the saturated phenomenon. Finally, I propose that God can “appear” only through an “inverted intentionality,” such as it is exemplified in certain divine manifestations recorded in Scripture, in the techniques of depicting the divine in icons, and finally, in the human person.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Paul Kidder The Ontology of Interrogation in Lonergan and Merleau-Ponty
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Despite being associated with different philosophical traditions, the philosophies of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Bernard Lonergan can be seen to possess a surprising number of fundamental and important points of intersection. Central among these is the conviction that the structure of interrogation provides not only the normative element in human knowing but also the principle clue for grasping the notion of being. From this confluence of ontological positions there follow a number of shared elements in the two thinkers’ approaches to basic questions in epistemology, philosophy of the person, and the philosophy of nature and natural science.
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
John F. Owens The God Whereof We Speak: D. Z. Phillips and the Question of God’s Existence
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
D. Z. Phillips holds that we cannot ask a general philosophical question about the existence of God because we discover what it means for God to exist only from within particular linguistic contexts, especially those of prayer and worship. This raises the suspicion that God’s existence therefore depends on a particular language-use, as does the existence of cultural objects like prices or the equator. The article suggests that Phillips’s position overlooks the peculiar status of other persons in our discourse, and the part they play in establishing a basic sense of “existence.” Closer consideration of this aspect of our language-use can take us beyond the limits of Phillips’s approach, and reopen the question of God’s existence in a strong sense.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Gordon Barnes Is Dualism Religiously and Morally Pernicious?
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In a recent address to the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Alfred Freddoso has claimed that dualism is both religiously and morally pernicious. He contends that dualism runs afoul of the Catholic teaching that the soul is the form of the body, and that dualism leaves the body with nothing more than instrumental moral worth. On the contrary, I argue that dualism per se is neither religiously nor morally pernicious. Dualism is compatible with a rich teleology of embodiment that will underwrite all of the same moral insights about the body that traditional hylomorphism supports.
discussion articles
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Jeremy D. Wilkins A Dialectic of “Thomist” Realisms: John Knasas and Bernard Lonergan
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
John F. X. Knasas has issued a series of philosophical and exegetical critiques of what he presents as the Cartesian subjectivism of “transcendental Thomism” in general and Bernard Lonergan in particular. But Professor Knasas’s spontaneous assumptions about knowing, objectivity, and reality are those of Descartes and Kant, not St. Thomas. He thus misinterprets St. Thomas and Fr. Lonergan and misconstrues the nature of knowing. The roots of the differences between Professor Knasas and Fr. Lonergan are exposed by contrasting two radically opposed accounts of knowing, two correlative meanings of the term ‘real’, and two correspondingly divergent interpretations of St. Thomas. In the process, Professor Knasas’s repeated misrepresentation of Fr. Lonergan is corrected.
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
John F.X. Knasas Why for Lonergan Knowing Cannot Consist in “Taking a Look”
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
Over the years I have written a number of articles critiquing Transcendental Thomism both from philosophical and from textual points of view. In the course of these articles, I have made comments on Bernard J. F. Lonergan’s epistemology. These comments have caught the eye of Jeremy D. Wilkins, and have provoked his article, “A Dialectic of ‘Thomist’ Realisms: John Knasas and Bernard Lonergan.” The violence of Wilkins’s reaction leads me to believe that despite the passing nature of my comments, they are sufficiently incisive to have cut a nerve. Nevertheless, it is my opinion that no reader of Wilkins would come away with any accurate grasp of my understanding of Lonergan, my reasons for it, and the precise point of contention between us. So, both for the record and the benefit of calm discussion of this influential figure, I would like to provide my hermeneutic of Lonergan and to pinpoint my trouble with him. To this end, I will repeat some descriptions of Lonergan from a recently published monograph, Being and Some Twentieth-Century Thomists (New York: Fordham University Press, 2003), and then address the criticisms of Wilkins.
book reviews
9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Paulette W. Kidder The Concept of Woman, Vol. II: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Fergus Kerr The Challenge of Truth: Reflections on Fides et Ratio
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
11. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
David Vincent Meconi Erich Przywara, S.J.: His Theology and His World
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
12. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Philipp W. Rosemann Foucault and Augustine: Reconsidering Power and Love
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
13. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Robert Kugelman Vico: The First New Science
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
books received
14. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 1
Books Received
view |  rights & permissions | cited by