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1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor Thomas Aquinas’s Commentary on the Ethics: Merely an Interpretation of Aristotle?
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In recent years, some controversy has arisen about whether Thomas Aquinas’s commentaries on Aristotle can be read as expressing Aquinas’s own views rather than as simply an interpretation of Aristotle. This article examines the reasons given in favor of the view that the commentaries, in particular the commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, are merely interpretations of Aristotle. Using Thomas’sscripture commentaries, internal evidence, as well as the history of reception, it is concluded that the Sententia libri ethicorum presents Thomas’s own views and not merely his understanding of Aristotle.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Mark D. Jordan Thomas as Commentator in Some Programs of Neo-Thomism: A Reply to Kaczor
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Arguments that Aquinas’s literal commentaries on Aristotle present his own philosophy are often proxies for larger claims about the relation of philosophy to theology. While trying to secure a place for Thomas in philosophic conversation, such arguments impose modern notions of an autonomous and apodictic philosophy, with fixed genres of declarative speech. The result is neither a plausiblereading of the Thomistic corpus nor a helpful exemplar for contemporary Catholic philosophy.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Nancy Hudson Theosis: A Soteriological Consequence of Nicholas of Cusa’s Apophatic Anthropology
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Nicholas of Cusa presents a negative theology in which divine mystery penetrates the created order. As part of creation, human being is a locus for God’s presence. If God is mysterious and unknown, then so is human being. In the thought of Cusanus, traditional apophaticism becomes anthropological apophaticism, but this extension of mystery to human being does not lead to skepticism.Instead, it opens up the possibility of deification. As the mind seeks to know itself, it is led to an understanding of all things enfolded in God. It discovers that it does not know itself and must turn to God, its Beginning. The drive to understand human nature is, for Cusanus, a divinely ordained task in which the mind finds its true being only as it finds itself in God.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Justin Skirry Does Descartes’s Real Distinction Argument Prove Too Much?
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Arnauld raised the concern that Descartes’s real distinction argument proved too much, because it seemed to lead us back to the Platonic view according to which the mind uses the body as its vehicle. Descartes responds by pointing out that he argued against this account of mind-body union in the Sixth Meditation. Descartes believes he did not prove too much, because he offers an argument against this view whose premises and conclusion are consistent with the real distinction argument. In this paper, the union argument is reconstructed and evaluated in order to see if, through his rejection of the Platonic view, Descartes adequately addresses Arnauld’s concern. In the end, Descartes adequately addresses this concern only if God’s veracity provides a secure foundation for a crucial inference. Finally, these considerations show a way for those committed to the real distinction of mind and body to avoid the problem of their interaction.
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Wayne J. Hankey Why Heidegger’s “History” of Metaphysics is Dead
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I outline features of the emerging consensus that philosophy has now liberated itself from the horizon of onto-theology with respect to the history of metaphysics. I draw on Jean-Marc Narbonne, Hénologie, Ontologie et Ereignis (Plotin-Proclus-Heidegger), conferences presented at La métaphysique: son histoire, sa critique, ses enjeux held at Laval University in 1998, and other recent work, showingwhy Heidegger’s horizon does not encompass ancient or medieval Platonic or Aristotelian philosophy. Noting that both French Neoplatonic studies after Bréhier and Heidegger in Identität und Diff erenz were opposing Hegelian accounts of the history of philosophy, I suggest that: (1) both were reacting to the same problem, (2) French Neoplatonism was motivated by Heidegger’s questions, (3) Heidegger’s account of Being beyond the diff erence of Being and beings resembles the Neoplatonic account of the One.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Conor Cunningham Lacan, Philosophy’s Difference, and Creation from No-One
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Using the work of Lacan but with reference to a number of other philosophers, this article argues eight main theses: first of all, that non-Platonic philosophical construction follows after a foundational destruction; second, that philosophy generally has a nothing outside its text, one that allows for the formation of that text—for example, Kant forms the text of phenomena only by way of the noumena; third, that this transcendental nothing renders all identities ideal, however that is conceived—an example being Badiou’s notion of “belonging,” one derived from the work of Georg Cantor and Paul Cohen; fourth, that a consequence of this ideality is mereological nihilism; fifth, due to this mereological nihilism any existent is only ever an aggregate, that is, an aggregate of some base element, or “stuff ”—a position that returns such philosophy to that of the ancients; sixth, this collapses idealism and materialism into each other, a collapse marked by what is referred to throughout as an impossible monism. Moreover, this impossible monism is a result of philosophy’s constant production of a bastard trinity—a dual monism, as it were. Seventh, that there are two models of difference evident in non-Platonic philosophy: the first is that of a block, with difference cut into it—like Swiss cheese, as it were—while the second is a flux which we seek to arrest with local regimes of stability. Eighth, and finally, that theology, in line with Plato, suggests the possibility of another difference, namely, a peaceable one.
book discussion
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
William Irwin Jorge J. E. Gracia’s How Can We Know What God Means?
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8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
David Vessey Reducing Religion to Theology: On Gracia on the Interpretation of Revealed Texts
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9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Gregory Bassham Gracia on Divine Revelation
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10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Colleen McCluskey Gracia and the Question of Religious Relativism
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11. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Jorge J.E. Gracia Revelation, Interpretation, and Relativism: A Response to Some Critics of How Can We Know What God Means?
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book reviews
12. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Bernardo Canteñs Middle Knowledge
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13. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Joshua Parens Islamic Humanism
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14. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
John O’Callaghan Aristotle’s Theory of Language and Meaning
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15. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Joseph W. Ulatowski Paradoxes: Their Roots, Range and Resolution
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16. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Charles Bambach Heidegger and the Quest for the Sacred: From Thought to the Sanctuary of Faith
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17. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Dennis L. Sepper Heidegger, Authenticity and Modernity: Essays in Honor of Hubert L. Dreyfus, vol. 1.
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books received
18. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 78 > Issue: 3
Books Received
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