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Displaying: 1-15 of 15 documents


articles
1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Wayne J. Hankey Radical Orthodoxy’s Poiēsis: Ideological Historiography and Anti-Modern Polemic
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For Radical Orthodoxy participatory poiēsis is the only form of authentic postmodern theology and determines its dependence upon, as well as the character of, its narrative of the history of philosophy. Th is article endeavors to display how the polemical anti-modernism of the movement results in a disregard for the disciplines of scholarship, so that ideological fables about our cultural history pass for theology. Because of the Radical Orthodox antipathy to philosophy, its assertions cannot be proven rationally either in principle or in fact, and its followers are reduced to accepting its stories on the authority of their tellers. The moral and rational disciplines are replaced with a postmodern incarnational neo-Neoplatonism in which the First Principle and sensual life are immediately united, without themediation of soul or mind. With this disappearance of theoria, surrender to the genuinely other, or even attentive listening, become impossible.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Bernard G. Prusak Faith and Reason in Theory and Practice: Some Reflections on the Responsibility of the Philosopher in Teaching Ethics at a Catholic University
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This paper takes up the question, “What is the responsibility of the philosopher, specifically the Catholic philosopher, in teaching ethics at a Catholic university?” Examination of the constitution Ex Corde Ecclesiae reveals that answering this question requires examining in turn the relationship between theology and philosophy. Accordingly, the paper proceeds to an analysis of the late Pope John Paul II’s encyclical, Fides et Ratio. Th is analysis shows, however, that the very distinction between theology and philosophy seems to become problematic on the encyclical’s terms. The paper thus goes on to indicate a different means of distinguishing these disciplines, and concludes by considering the significance of this distinction for the question of the responsibility of the Catholic philosopher.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Gregory B. Sadler Mercy and Justice in St. Anselm’s Proslogion
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An important issue raised and resolved in St. Anselm’s Proslogion is the compatibility between justice and mercy as divine attributes. In this paper I argue (1) that Anselm’s discussion of divine justice and mercy is an exploration of God’s nature as quo maius cogitari non potest, and (2) that his discussion contributes to a better understanding of the complicated relationship between God and creatures—including the creatures attempting to know or argue about God. It seems at first that God’s mercy must be in contradiction with God’s justice. On the basis of a more adequate way of framing the issue, however—one that requires reference to other parts of the Proslogion and is supported by the Monologion—we can grasp, though not fully comprehend, the harmony between divine justice and divine mercy.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
James B. Reichmann Scotus and Haecceitas, Aquinas and Esse: A Comparative Study
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This study compares the teachings of Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus on the issue of being and individuality. Its primary aim is to contrast Scotus’s individuating principle, haecceitas, with Aquinas’s actualizing principle, esse, attending both to their rather striking similarities as well as to their significant differences. The article’s conclusion is that, while Scotus’s crowning principle, haecceitas, is the unique entity internal to each thing, rendering the nature complete and singular as nature, Aquinas’s crowning principle, esse, actualizes the nature without individualizing it. This is not to imply that Scotus overlooked the importance of a thing’s being, any more than Aquinas overlooked the importance of a being’s singularity. It does mean, however, that the primal integrating focus and the resulting philosophical synthesis of these two seminal thinkers of the Middle Ages did significantly differ. The conclusion of the paper might be stated thus: what most distinguishes their respective philosophies is that, while Scotus’s primary concern was with the existing individual, Aquinas’s was with the existing individual.
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
David VanDrunen Medieval Natural Law and the Reformation: A Comparison of Aquinas and Calvin
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An important aspect of the contemporary controversies over John Calvin’s natural law doctrine has been his relation to the medieval natural law inheritance. This paper attempts to put Calvin in better context through a detailed examination of his ideas on natural law, in comparison with those of Thomas Aquinas. I argue that significant points of both similarity and difference between them must berecognized. Among important similarities, I highlight their grounding of natural law in the divine nature and the relationship of natural to civil law. Among important differences I note issues of participation, conscience, and the two kingdoms doctrine. Calvin resides in the same broad tradition of natural law as Thomas Aquinas, although he represents a somewhat different strand of it.
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Joseph Shaw Intention, Proportionality, and the Duty of Aid
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When moral rules are formulated in terms of intentions, agents are forbidden to countenance harms that are out of proportion with the good they are intending to achieve. Shelly Kagan has argued that if resources are not used for the most value-producing purpose, the agent will be allowing a harm or loss greater than the good intended. I argue that this understanding of proportionality is incorrect, since it displaces the common-sense understanding of the duty of aid, which varies in stringency according to the agent’s relationship with the person in need, and other factors. I suggest that proportionality should be understood in terms of the duty of aid. Even in pursuing an intended good, one must not infringe one’s duty of aid to others.
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Christopher Tollefsen Persons in Time
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It can seem implausible that a merely bodily existence could be also a personal existence. Two related lines of thought can mitigate this implausibility. The first, developed in the first part of this paper, is the thought that our bodily existence is better described as an organic, animal existence. Organisms, I argue, are essentially temporal; this essential temporality makes sense of the possibility thatsome organisms are persons. The second line of thought, addressed in the second part of the paper, considers the relationship between the notion of a person, and temporal existence. Persons need not exist in time, but some do. Consideration of what the temporal existence of a person must be like makes organic existence seem an appropriate way for temporal persons to exist.
book reviews
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Glenn Chicoine Edith Stein
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9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Salman Bashier Knowing Persons: A Study in Plato
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10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Siobhan F. Marshall Boethius
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11. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Theresa Kenney The Metaphysics of Dante’s Comedy
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12. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Jason T. Eberl Death and Dying: A Reader
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13. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Roland J. Teske Access to God in Augustine’s Confessions: Books X—XIII
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14. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
William A. Frank The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus
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books received
15. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 80 > Issue: 1
Books Received
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