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Displaying: 1-10 of 17 documents


articles
1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Ilia Delio, O.S.F. Is Creation Really Good?: Bonaventure’s Position
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The relationship between being and goodness is one of the most engaging philosophical questions, particularly in light of the new science, which pointsto the interconnectedness of the physical world. The relationship between being and goodness is examined here in the thought of Bonaventure, who maintainsa primacy of the good. Bonaventure’s integration of philosophy and theology provides an understanding of being as goodness and hence an understandingof being as relational and generative. Because being is good, created reality is intrinsically good and bears within it an inner dynamic toward the pleroma oflove. The implications of Bonaventure’s metaphysics of the good for ecology and epistemology are explored.
2. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Declan Lawell Thomas Aquinas, Jean-Luc Marion, and an Alleged Category Mistake Involving God and Being
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This article seeks to defend the possibility of a metaphysical approach to philosophical theology. Challenging the claim that there can be nothing in commonbetween God (with whom theology or even a form of phenomenology such as Jean-Luc Marion’s deals) and being (as expounded for example in the metaphysical approach of Thomas Aquinas), the article develops a critique of Marion’s views with close reference to his interpretations of Aquinas.
3. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Jan-Hendryk de Boer Faith and Knowledge in the Religion of the Renaissance: Nicholas of Cusa, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, and Savonarola
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Although the fifteenth century showed some signs of traditionalism and disintegration, there were also highly original new solutions to long-debated problemsin scholastic and humanistic discourse. As for the relation between faith and reason, Nicholas of Cusa, Giovanni Pico della Mirandola, and Savonarola foundnew ways to integrate these poles, around which theological and philosophical thought was organized. As a common pattern, one can discern a striving beyond the established systems of humanism and scholasticism, mingling elements of both traditions with those from the movements of spiritual reform in the later Middle Ages. This “striving beyond” was possible due to a performative turn in the fifteenth century: thinking and acting were connected by the narrator or the author in a manner that produced theoretical concepts and acts in social reality by writing, thinking, and actively developing the self.
4. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
J. Obi Oguejiofor Negritude as Hermeneutics: A Reinterpretation of Léopold Sédar Senghor’s Philosophy
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While highlighting the inherent tension between the quest for universalization and the unavoidable particularity in philosophical hermeneutics, this essay argues against what it regards as the uncritical characterization of Leopold Sedar Senghor’s concept of “negritude” in terms of ethnophilosophy, a derogatoryterm employed in contemporary African philosophy to describe philosophy that is communal, and which can be sieved out from such genres as proverbs, wise sayings, and myths. It reviews the background and the contents of negritude, including its metaphysics and its epistemology of emotion. It calls attention to Senghor’s ideas about communalism and his universalism seen in his theory of the civilization of the universal, and concludes that Senghor’s negritude is the outcome of a particular and personal interpretation of his experience of the African condition, and is therefore eminently hermeneutical.
5. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Robert E. Wood Five Bodies—and a Sixth: On the Place of Awareness in the Cosmos
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What one takes to be a body is identified initially as what is available to sensing. Sensing and reflecting are not so available. How one conceives of theirrelation admits of at least six possibilities exhibited in the history of philosophy: Hobbesian materialism, Berkleyan idealism, Platonic dualism of soul and body,Aristotelian hylomorphism, Cartesian dualism of thought and extension, and a Leibnizian-Whiteheadian view of psycho-physical co-implication. The latter viewredraws the conceptual map in a way most in keeping with experience as a whole and with neural physiology in particular.
discussions
6. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Marie I. George Descartes’s Language Test for Rationality: A Response to Michael Miller
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Contrary to Michael Miller, I maintain that Descartes’s language test adequately distinguishes humans from non-human animals, and that the bonobosKanzi and Panbanisha have not passed it. Miller accepts Descartes’s language test as a good test for true language usage, but denies that it is an adequate test for the presence or absence of reason. I argue that it is a good test for reason, for normal rational beings eventually recognize the desirableness of knowledge of the world for its own sake as well as the fact that such knowledge can be increased by conversing with others. I also argue that the tests administered to the bonobos in question are inadequate for determining true language usage, as they could be passed by animals merely capable of associative learning.
7. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Michael R. Kelly The Consciousness of Succession: A Reply to a Response to My “On the Mind’s Pronouncement of Time”
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For all its subtle differences, Husserl scholarship on time-consciousness has reached a consensus that Husserl’s theory underwent a significant interpretiveimprovement starting around 1908 / 1909. On this advance, which concerned the intentional structure and directedness of absolute consciousness, I have cautioned against reading Augustine’s theory of time as a philosophical predecessor to Husserl’s. In a recent “confrontation” with my efforts, Roger Wasserman tried to defend a reading of Augustine’s influence on Husserl’s theory of time by criticizing my reading of Augustine and Husserl. This reply to Wasserman’s challenge (i) reestablishes my reservations about attempts to claim a relation between Augustine and Husserl on time-consciousness, (ii) defends the standard interpretation of the development of Husserl’s theory of time-consciousness, and (iii) raises several critical questions about Wasserman’s Neoplatonic or Augustinian reading of Husserl on time-consciousness.
review article
8. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Peter M. Candler, Jr. The Alleged Thomism of Mark Jordan: A Review of Rewritten Theology
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Mark Jordan’s recent book, Rewritten Theology, challenges the way in which the achievement of Thomas Aquinas has been both received and reformulated,often in order to serve particular theological and philosophical ends. It helps to unmask the often hidden presuppositions behind efforts to “police” Thomism, efforts which frequently require a revision and a rewriting of the texts of Aquinas themselves. At a time when it appears that there is a repristinization of the Thomistic “synthesis” reminiscent of Garrigou-Lagrange, this book is an auspicious reminder that such “synthesis” often comes at the cost of fidelity to theMaster in whose name it is fashioned.
book reviews
9. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
John Haldane Philosophical Papers
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10. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 83 > Issue: 1
Roland J. Teske, S.J. Aquinas the Augustinian
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