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The Acorn

Volume 17, Issue 2, Fall 2017

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Displaying: 1-9 of 9 documents


1. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Greg Moses Editor's Introduction
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gene sharp (1928-2018)
2. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Barry Gan Remembering Gene Sharp: Theorist of Political Nonviolence
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3. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Jack DuVall Gene Sharp and the Twenty-First Century
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articles
4. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Charles K. Fink Nonviolence and Tolstoy’s Hard Question
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Pacifists are often put on the defensive with cases—real or imagined—in which innocent people are threatened by violent criminals. Is it always wrong to respond to violence with violence, even in defense of the innocent? This is the “hard” question addressed in this article. I argue that it is at least permissible to maintain one’s commitment to nonviolence in such cases. This may not seem like a bold conclusion, yet pacifists are often ridiculed—sometimes as cowards, sometimes as selfish moral purists—for their refusal to use violence in defense of others. In this article, I try to show that such scorn is unjustified.
5. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Matthew Rukgaber Guns as Lies: A Kantian Criticism of the Supposed Right to Bear Arms
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Using Kant’s argument that lies are evil and reprehensible in themselves regardless of the benefits that may result, I show that guns can be understood in similar terms. In a unique reading of Kant’s radical and often ridiculed ideas, I maintain that lies have this status because of the way they pervert our relationship to the truth and thus to morality and reason. Lies turn truth and reason into mere means to be used rather than to be obeyed. Kant believes that the result is arrogance, insincerity, and self-deception in the form of moral impurity and depravity. This gives way to the morally bankrupt logics of the passions for honor, dominance, and possession. I argue that this destruction of virtue and of our relation to the moral law can be found in our relation to guns. Guns are not just killing machines; they are deception machines. It is for that reason, regardless of the costs and benefits, that the Kantian should deny that we have any right to them.
book reviews
6. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Court Lewis Reframing Islam as a Nonviolent Force: Review of Chaiwat Satha-Anand. Nonviolence and Islamic Imperatives
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7. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
William Gay Undermining Neoliberalism: Review of Todd May. Nonviolent Resistance: A Philosophical Introduction
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8. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Sanjay Lal Ahimsa as a Way of Life: Review of Predrag Cicovacki and Kendy Hess, editors. Nonviolence as a Way of Life: History, Theory, and Practice
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9. The Acorn: Volume > 17 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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