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1. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Peter H. Wickersham

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2. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Christopher A. DeCock

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3. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
William L. Saunders

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essays

4. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Louis Brown

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Louis Brown discusses the mission of sharing the healing love of Christ, particularly in health care. He investigates how doing so requires that we respect the rights to life, conscience, and religious freedom as the foundations for human dignity in our health care system.
5. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Teresa Stanton Collett

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Teresa Stanton Collett discusses the flawed conception of personhood that led to Roe v. Wade, the legal developments that led to the decision in Dobbs, and strategies for protecting the unborn in the new legal landscape.
6. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Jonathan J. Sanford

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In light of truths expressed by Thomas Aquinas and in lawyers’ oaths, lawyers sworn to uphold the civil law must work toward the goal of teaching and gradually encouraging citizens to have the inner virtues that would make civil law itself irrelevant. This follows from claims central to the civic and the Catholic intellectual traditions: the civil law is a teacher, its effect ought to be the promotion of virtue, and virtuous living is constitutive of the common good. Natural law undergirds and gives substance to the civil law, which nonetheless should only demand under fear of punishment what is followable for the majority of men, given the needs of good public order and the habits and customs of their country.

articles

7. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Charles S. LiMandri

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The author explores recent cases involving Church closure, cancellation of historical figures, instructional materials in public schools, display of religious symbols on public land, and his current work defending the First Amendment rights of Christian bakers.
8. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Mike Schutt

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Mike Schutt dissects ABA Model Rule 8.4(g), exposing its vagueness, excessive breadth, and prima facia viewpoint discrimination.
9. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
C’Zar Bernstein

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In this talk presented at the 2022 conference of the Catholic Bar Association, C’Zar Bernstein unpacks the meaning of the word person in the Fourteenth Amendment and, through his exegesis, identifies philosophical arguments that may be instrumental in affording legal protection to the most vulnerable members of society.

verbatim

10. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Most Rev. Joseph Fred Naumann

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notes & abstracts

11. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Vince A. Punzo

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12. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Christopher Kaczor

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book reviews

13. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Abigail Wilkinson Miller

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14. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 3
Jeanatan Hall

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15. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Edward J. Furton

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16. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Arina Grossu Agnew

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essays

17. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
John F. Brehany

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The first edition of the Ethical Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services was published in 1948. Since then, it has undergone two major revisions and several smaller ones. The following essay explores the history of the ERDs and the important aspects of these revisions.

18. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2

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commentaries

19. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Jozef D. Zalot

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Part One of the ERDs addresses the balance Catholic health care institutions must strike between their mission to carry out the healing ministry of Christ and the demands of the US health care system. Divided into two sections, the commentary begins by proposing revisions to the Part One introduction focusing on enhanced application of Catholic social teaching principles and a renewed call for robust conscience and religious liberty protections. It then proposes additions to the Part One directives designed to help Catholic health care respond with integrity to the many contemporarychallenges it faces, and to more full live out its mission and identity.
20. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Rev. Hyacinth Grubb, OP

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Part Two of the Ethical and Religious Directives outlines the responsibility to care for the spiritual needs of patients and residents, following the example of Christ who both healed the sick and forgave them their sins. The proposed revisions to the introduction add a more explicit focus on the dignity of the sick, the redemptive value of suffering, and the potential evangelization that takes place through institutional health care. The proposed revisions to the directives emphasize that patients and residents have a right to receive spiritual and sacramental care. Likewise, Catholic healthcare institutions, medical staff, and pastoral care personnel have an obligation to arrange and provide adequate spiritual and sacramental care.