Cover of Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture
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1. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
David Paul Deavel Preface: It’s the End of the World as We Know It (and I Feel Fine)
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2. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Samuel Korb Cast into Hell: Satan, Universalism, and Contemporary Eschatology
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3. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Fr. John Nepil All Fires Burn Out: Resentment in Sigrid Undset’s Kristin Lavransdatter
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4. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Thomas Pfau Kantian Aesthetics as “Soft” Iconoclasm
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5. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Fr. Guy Mansini Acts 17 and the Integral Structure of Christian Hope
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6. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Jacob Phillips John Henry Newman and the English Sensibility
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reconsiderations
7. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Samuel Klumpenhouwer John of Kent and Medieval Pastoral Care
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8. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
John of Kent Handbook on Penance, Selections from Book 3
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9. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 3
Contributor Notes
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10. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
David Paul Deavel Preface: A Fruitful Assertion of Selflessness: H. Wendell Howard, 1927–2020
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11. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dwight Lindley Intelligibility and Transcendence in Narrative
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12. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Andrew Meszaros A Philosophical Habit of Mind: Newman and the University
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13. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Grant Kaplan Revisiting Johannes Eck: The Leipzig Debate as the Beginning of the Reformation
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14. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Thomas Esposito Echoes of Ecclesiastes in the Poetry and Plays of T. S. Eliot
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15. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Michael P. Carroll Moving from Vatican Bling to Malchus’s Ear: Taking the “Catholic Imagination” Seriously When Thinking About Catholic Devotions in Centuries Past
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16. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Contributor Notes
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17. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
David Paul Deavel Preface: A Classic for All Times: Manzoni’s The Betrothed
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18. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Philip A. Rolnick Veiling and Revealing: Ancient Myth and Christian Grace in C. S. Lewis’s Till We Have Faces
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19. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Paul Treschow “You Aren’t You, Are You?”: Transhumanism, the Person, and the Resurrection in Black Mirror’s “Be Right Back”
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In this article I consider the failed resurrection of the beloved in “Be Right Back” in conversation with Christian doctrine surroundingChrist’s resurrection. I contend that the resurrected Ash is insufficient for Martha because he is not a “person,” intendingwith that term to evoke the Catholic personalist movement, particularly as outlined by Jacques Maritain. I begin with an outlineof Maritain’s personalism and then discuss the Enlightenment conception of the self that Charles Taylor has called “the ‘punctual’self ” and its relation to transhumanism. These competing accounts of personhood frame a discussion of “Be Right Back,” in whichI contend that the resurrected Ash is a hyperpunctual self and that his lack of personality makes true loving exchange between himand Martha impossible. Finally, I draw on Augustine’s teaching on the Resurrection and the New Testament resurrection accountsthemselves to consider how Christ’s Resurrection affirms the centrality of persons and love, fulfilling the desire for a resurrection ofthe beloved’s person that is implicit in the critiques of a nonpersonalist resurrection in “Be Right Back.”
20. Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Martin Lockerd, Aaron Miller Death in Venice and the Specter of Christ
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