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Displaying: 1-10 of 132 documents


1. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Margo Kitts, Introduction: Violence, Religion, and the State
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articles
2. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Juli L. Gittinger, The Rhetoric of Violence, Religion, and Purity in India’s Cow Protection Movement
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In India there has been a recent increase in violence and intolerance towards people who eat beef. While India has a fairly wide Cow Protection Act that bars the slaughter of female cows and calves, many areas have permitted slaughter of bulls and bullocks for centuries. Hindu religion has no doctrinal proscriptions against the consumption of beef in particular, although it has borrowed heavily from Jainism in the last century, arguing that the concept of ahimsa (nonviolence) forbids such slaughter and consumption of beef. Violence is exacted upon those who would dare eat beef—notably Muslims and lower castes—further politicizing the issue. This paper explores the various claims and legitimations of violence regarding the tradition of abstaining from beef. These include arguments of religious purity, racial biases, caste, and cultural arguments which have been put forth in defense of or in condemnation of beef-eaters. I argue that, in the case of such regulations of “authentic” Hindu traditions (like the sanctity of the cow), purity concerns are directly tied to Hindu nationalist ideologies.
3. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Paul R. Powers, Territory Is Not Map: Deterritorialisation, Mere Religion, and Islamic State
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While the Islamic State (IS) has much in common with many other contemporary jihadist groups, this article argues that it expresses a distinctive attitude toward the taking, holding, and expanding of territory. Olivier Roy’s notion of the “deterritorialisation” of late-modern Muslim religiosity suggests that many Muslims, whether in minority or majority situations, perceive themselves as detached from “home” lands and cultures and, partly as a result, find Islam reduced from a holistic phenomenon to a truncated and compartmentalized “mere religion.” IS efforts to take territory can be seen in part as a rejection of such deterritorialisation. The IS version of a reinvigorated Islam is made possible solely by the possession of territory, and hinges on apocalyptic expectations about certain concrete locations and on the possibility of enacting a robust, hyper-aggressive form of Islamic law.
4. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Yonatan Y. Brafman, Towards a Neo-Ḥaredi Political Theory: Schlesinger, Breuer, and Leibowitz between Religion and Zionism
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This article explores the resources available in modern Jewish thought for overcoming the conflict between secular liberalism and religious nationalism. In addition to a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence, the modern state’s claim to sovereignty demands the reconstruction of existing social formations, normative orderings, and personal identities. The primary Jewish responses to this demand have been either the privatizing of Judaism as religion or the nationalizing of Jewishness as Zionism. However, this demand was resisted by diverse thinkers, including Akiva Yosef Schlesinger, Isaac Breuer, and Yeshayahu Leibowitz, who can be described as advancing a Neo-Ḥaredi political theory. This theory has five related characteristics: (1) an affirmation of the publicity of halakhah, or Jewish law; (2) a rejection of the construction of Judaism as a “religion”; (3) a lack of aspiration to establish halakhah as state law; (4) a refusal of the identification of the state as the unitary locus of sovereignty; and (5) an ambivalent relation to Zionism, ranging from indifference, to disappointment, and opposition. Common to these reactions is a decentering of the state and its claim to sovereignty in favor of a plurality of social formations, normative orderings, and identities. It is suggested that such an approach may provide a way of avoiding the zero-sum game for control of the state that seems to plague the current politics of both the United States and Israel/Palestine.
book reviews
5. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
David Morgan, Human Remains in Society: Curation and Exhibition in the Aftermath of Genocide and Mass-Violence. Ed. Jean-Marc Dreyfus and Élisabeth Anstett
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6. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Bobby A. Wintermute, The Great and Holy War: How World War I Became a Religious Crusade. Philip Jenkins
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7. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Kelly Denton-Borhaug, The Origins of American Religious Nationalism. Sam Hasselby
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8. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Jarbel Rodriguez, The Mercenary Mediterranean: Sovereignty, Religion, and Violence in the Medieval Crown of Aragon. Hussein Fancy
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9. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Jennifer Barry, City of Demons: Violence, Ritual, and Christian Power in Late Antiquity. Dayna S. Kalleres
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10. Journal of Religion and Violence: Volume > 5 > Issue: 2
Rhiannon Graybill, Sex and Slaughter in the Tent of Jael: A Cultural History of a Biblical Story. Colleen M. Conway
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