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Displaying: 1-20 of 45 documents


articles
1. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Antonio Calcagno Introduction: Rethinking the One and the Many with Badiou
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2. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alain Beaulieu Qui est Alain Badiou?
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3. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alain Badiou, Simon Critchley Comments on Simon Critchley’s Infinitely Demanding
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4. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alberto Toscano Emblems and Cuts: Philosophy in and against History
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Alain Badiou’s theory of the subject has consistently opposed a vision of History as meaning and totality, for the sake of an internal, subjective and discontinuous grasp of the periodisation of political “sequences.” This article examines the theoretical trajectory that leads Badiou to dislocate the historical dialectic, generating a comprehension of political time which is no longer bound to an ordered matrix of expression and development; it also considers Badiou’s relation tovarious strands of anti-humanist anti-historicism and tackles the theoretical tensions that inhere in his disjunction of nature and history. The article concludes by discussing the effect of Badiou’s notion of periodisation on the very historicity and mutability of his own philosophical apparatus, and the immanent threat posed to his thinking of the event by an ‘absolute historicism.’
5. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Gabriel Riera “Living with an Idea”: Ethics and Politics in Badiou’s Logiques des mondes
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The essay addresses the main shifts in Badiou’s conception of the event and the subject as they unfold in his late Logiques des mondes. In this text he develops an objective phenomenology of appearing in view of specifying the logical character of real change. The main focus of the essay is how Logiques des mondes stipulates a set of directives for an “ethics of living with an Idea,” that is, a subjective incorporation to truth as exception. How does Badiou’s text write what is excluded from the inertia of a restricted economy of Being? I show that in order to account for this exception, Logiques des mondes must resituate the notionof site, prevalent in Being and Event, and that it does so in terms of the notion of world and of the localisation of appearing (both of which entail the formulation of an objective phenomenology of appearing or logic of appearing). This logic posits the articulation of a new transcendental regime whose major coordinates unfold as a true war machine against cultural relativism, or what Badiou calls “democratic materialism” and to which he contraposes a “materialist dialectics”(dialectique matérialiste).
6. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Jeff Love, Todd May From Universality to Inequality: Badiou’s Critique of Rancière
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Alain Badiou argues in “Rancière and Apolitics” that Rancière has appropriated his central idea of equality from Badiou’s own work. We argue that Badiou’s characterisation of Rancière’s project is correct, but that his self-characterisation is mistaken. What Badiou’s ontology of events opens out onto is not necessarily equality, but instead universality. Equality is only one form of universality, but there is nothing in Badiou’s thought that prohibits the (multiple) universality he positsfrom being hierarchical. In the end, then, Badiou’s thought moves in a Maoist direction while Rancière’s in an anarchist one.
7. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Tzuchien Tho The Consistency of Inconsistency: Alain Badiou and the Limits of Mathematical Ontology
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Alain Badiou’s reception in the English-speaking world has centred on his project of a “mathematical ontology” undertaken in Being and Event. Its reception has raised serious concerns about how mathematics could be relevant to concrete situations. Caution must be taken in applying mathematics to concrete situationsand, without making explicit the equivocal senses of “consistency” as it operates in Badiou’s thought, this caution cannot be precisely applied. By examining Being and Event as well as looking backwards at his first philosophical work, The Concept of Model, some key distinctions on the meaning of “consistency” will be clarified.
8. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Gert-Jan Van Der Heiden The Scintillation of the Event: On Badiou’s Phenomenology
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In Le Sens du monde, Nancy argues that “some value of scintillating phenomenality remains invincibly attached” to Badiou’s notion of the event. This paper examines to what extent Nancy’s comments still apply to Badiou’s phenomenology of the event developed in Logiques des mondes. In particular, although Badiou provides a thorough account of the event from the perspective of the consequences it enables, I show on the basis of Nancy’s suggestion that he tends to neglect an account of the event from the perspective of its occurrence and its passage.
9. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Nick Srnicek What is to be Done?: Alain Badiou and the Pre-Evental
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While Alain Badiou’s resuscitation of the subject has provided continental philosophy with new possibilities for political activism, its reliance on rare events has also paved the way for a potentially paralysing pre-evental situation. The aim of this paper is to examine Badiou’s own writings for hints of a theoreticallyjustified pre-evental politics—one that not only works within the ambit of his philosophical project but is also capable of explaining Badiou’s practical engagements in the politics of France. Two solutions are offered through an examination of the implications of heterogeneous situations: a repetition of events and apre-evental mobilisation of the uncounted.
10. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Dan Mellamphy, Nandita Biswas Mellamphy Paulitics
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In this essay we offer an interpretation of Alain Badiou’s theorisation of Paul the Apostle as a “universal singularity.” Our aim is to explore the extent to which Badiou’s articulation of political subjectivity provides a radically different locus and topos for the “political”—one that is rooted not in a concept of the abstract individual but rather in the material and generative process of individuation (“subjectivation”). Following Badiou, we explore the implications of the ontological shiftthat Paul represents—the shift from an external “body politic” (that of the polis, political crew or community) to an internal “body politic” (based on complicitous bodies, embodiments, incarnations—here a ‘body politic’ complicitous with the Christ-event). In this respect, Badiou’s reading of Paul establishes “the political” as “the subjective” precisely in the sense that the locus of the political is the complicitous subject as such rather than an externalised abstraction such as “thestate.” Paulitics manifests itself in and as this subject subjected to the event—the “militant subject” that embodies and endures its “process,” its “truth procedure.”
book session
11. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alain Beaulieu, Fadi Abou-Rihan, Eugene Holland Deleuze and Guattari’s Philosophy of History
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graduate student essay prize winner
12. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Florentien Verhage The Body as Measurant of All: Dis-covering the World
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In this paper I re-evaluate Merleau-Ponty’s use of the term “measurant.” I argue that Merleau-Ponty’s “body as measurant” (VI 249/297) describes embodied perception as a tuning into and a dis-covering of a world that is never completely in its grasp. I dis-cover in the world objects and other persons, which sweep me away from the centre of the world and which offer me new perceptual dimensions. This relation does not necessarily imply agreement and harmony, but it suggests that all our interactions, even those that are disharmonious and ambiguous, take place in a back-and-forth of response and transformation.
comptes rendus/book reviews
13. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Aaron James Landry The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory
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14. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Bryan Smyth Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology: The Problem of Ideal Objects
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15. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alain Beaulieu Gilles Deleuze et Félix Guattari: Biographie croisée
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16. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Alain Beaulieu Anthropologie du point de vue pragmatique
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17. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Mihail Dafydd Evans Infinitely Demanding
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18. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Patrick Gamez Ethics at a Standstill: History and Subjectivity in Levinas and the Frankfurt School
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19. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Melanija Marušić A New Philosophy of Society: Assemblage Theory and Social Complexity
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20. Symposium: Volume > 12 > Issue: 2
Brian Willems Hiddenness and Alterity: Philosophical and Literary Sightings of the Unseen
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