Cover of Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual
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1. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Richard Polt Letter from the Editor
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thinking amidst the pandemic
2. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Kevin Aho The Uncanny in the Time of Pandemics: Heideggerian Reflections on the Coronavirus
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This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of Heidegger’s account of “the uncanny” (das Unheimliche) as it relates to the coronavirus pandemic. It explores how the pandemic has disrupted Dasein’s sense of “homelike” (heimelig) familiarity and how this disruption has undermined our ability to be, that is, to understand or make sense of things. By examining our experience of temporality, lived-space, and intersubjectivity, the paper illuminates different ways in which the pandemic has left us confused and anxious about our self-interpretations and future projects. The paper concludes by showing how the uncanny is not simply something we feel in times of crisis; it is, for Heidegger, who we are. This means the secure feeling of familiarity that we embodied prior to the pandemic was an illusion all along, that we are not and never have been at-home in the world.
3. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Robert Manning The Later Heidegger and the Later Levinas in the Time of Coronavirus
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This article addresses the many ways the philosophies of the later Heidegger and the later Levinas speak to us in the time of the coronavirus pandemic. I argue that the pause in the world’s busy industrial life provides an ideal opportunity for what Heidegger called meditative thinking. The pandemic is also a time both of extreme bodily vulnerability and of extraordinary ethical responsibility for others, and so causes us to hear Levinas’ extreme language in Otherwise than Being about anarchic ethical responsibility and the self as a hostage in a very different way.
articles
4. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Friedrich-Wilhelm von Hermann, Thomas Sheehan The Unity in the Transformation of Martin Heidegger’s Thinking
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5. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
David C. Abergel The Confluence of Authenticity and Inauthenticity in Heidegger’s Being and Time
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I argue that there is a confluence of authenticity and inauthenticity inherent to the structure of average everydayness in Being and Time. I support this reading by recasting Heidegger’s notion of fallenness in Being and Time in terms of its precursor, ruinance, which he introduces in his 1921–22 lecture course, Phenomenological Interpretations of Aristotle: Initiation into Phenomenological Research (ga 61). In this lecture course, Heidegger explains that ruinance is constituted by a dual movement of relucence and prestruction: the former, an intentional openness to the world; the latter, a securing that conceals that openness. While this dual movement is not expressed explicitly in these terms in Being and Time, I show that it is nevertheless tacitly operative in the structure of falling and that it grounds the duality of average everydayness. I frame this study around the debate on how Dasein can be authentic despite its fallenness, given that fallenness paradoxically renders Dasein essentially inauthentic.
6. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Lawrence Berger Attention as the Way to Being
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I argue that staying with the movement of attention is the way to being. For attention moves in response to the appeal of being, which means that being shows itself in that movement. We are thus always already on the way to being, always already listening to its call. But something else is required, a special effort of attending to one’s own movement, a taking-heed (In-die-Acht-nehmen) that enables being to be made manifest in a more profound manner, which can transform our being in the world and associated ethical and political realities.
7. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
George Saad The Greek Sources of Heidegger’s Alētheia as Primordial Truth-Experience
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Heidegger develops his reading of a-lētheia as privative unconcealment (Unverborgenheit) in tandem with his early phenomenological theory of truth. He is not simply reinterpreting a word, but rather reading Greek philosophy as having a primordial understanding of truth which has itself been concealed in interpretation. After shedding medieval and modern presuppositions of truth as correspondence, the existential truth-experience shows itself, no longer left puzzlingly implicit in unsatisfactory conventional readings of Greek philosophy. In Sein und Zeit §44, Heidegger resolves interpretive difficulties in Parmenides through his interpretation of alētheia and philologically grounds this reading in Heraclitus’s description of the unconcealing logos. Although this primordial sense of the word has already been obscured in Plato and Aristotle, the structural gradation of their theories of truth conserves the primordial pre-Socratic sense of truth as the experience of unconcealment.
symposium: destiny
8. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Peg Birmingham, Gregory Fried, Laurence Hemming, Julia A. Ireland, Elliot R. Wolfson Destiny
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review essay
9. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Ian Alexander Moore On the History and Future of Heidegger’s Literary Estate, with Newly Published Passages on Nazism and Judaism: Klaus Held’s Marbach-Bericht
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book reviews
10. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Anthony Vincent Fernandez Contexts of Suffering: A Heideggerian Approach to Psychopathology
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11. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Carlos Zorrilla Sylvaine Gourdain, L’Ethos de l’im-possible: dans le sillage de Heidegger et de Schelling and Sortir du transcendental, Heidegger et sa lecture de Schelling
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12. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Gregory P. Floyd Ian Alexander Moore, Eckhart, Heidegger, and the Imperative of Releasement
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13. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
John Preston Robert C. Scharff, Heidegger Becoming Phenomenological: Interpreting Husserl through Dilthey, 1916–1925
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an open letter
14. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
John Rose An Open Letter to the Heidegger Circle: On Becoming Who We Are
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15. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 10
Texts of Heidegger cited and abbreviations used
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16. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 9
Richard Polt Letter from the Editor
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17. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 9
William J. Richardson, Richard Capobianco, Ian Alexander Moore From the Archives: William Richardson’s Questions for Martin Heidegger’s “Preface”
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Martin Heidegger wrote one and only one preface for a scholarly work on his thinking, and it was for William J. Richardson’s study Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought, first published in 1963. Ever since, both Heidegger’s Preface and Richardson’s groundbreaking book have played an important role in Heidegger scholarship. Much has been discussed about these texts over the decades, but what has not been available to students and scholars up to this point is Richardson’s original comments and questions to Heidegger that led to the famous Preface. These are published here for the first time both in the German original and in our English translation. In our commentary we 1) discuss how Heidegger’s Preface came about, 2) explain the source and status of the materials published here, and 3) pair selected passages from Richardson’s text with Heidegger’s reply in his Preface to highlight the consonance of their thinking.
18. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 9
Jennifer Gammage Accidental Origins: The Importance of Tuchē and Automaton for Heidegger’s 1922 Reading of Aristotle
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I examine a passage from Heidegger’s 1922 overview of a proposed book on Aristotle wherein he addresses the importance of Aristotle’s treatment of accidental (sumbebēkos) causes in the Physics II.4–6. My analysis shows that this passage plays a key role within the account of Aristotle’s ontology presented in the overview insofar as it allows Heidegger to open up a new way of reading Aristotle, one that both diagnoses and pushes through the inheritance of being understood as technē in order to retrieve originary insights about the movement of factical human life, world, and care. Rather than subordinate tuchē and automaton (chance) to the four “real” causes they would remain merely incidental to or derivative of, Heidegger asks that we recognize the priority of praxis, whose archē unfolds as care toward and within a world of accidents.
19. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 9
Paul Gyllenhammer Heidegger’s Epicureanism: Death, Dwelling and Ataraxia
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Heidegger and Epicurus seem to be separated by a great divide. Where Epicurus seeks ataraxia by minimizing anxiety and our concern with death, Heidegger describes how anxiety and death are factored into authentic living. But looks can be deceiving. A close study of Heidegger’s critique of das Man reveals a distinctly Epicurean line of thinking. His account of curiosity, in particular, parallels Epicurus’s own criticism of normal life as being mired in unnatural/empty desires due to an unconscious fear of death. Despite this similarity, Heidegger’s interest in ontological anxiety, i.e., homelessness, contrasts deeply with Epicurus’s goal of mental tranquility. Yet this difference is overcome, in part, in Heidegger’s turn to peaceful dwelling as an expression of authentic Being-in-the-world. Indeed, Heidegger’s account of the fourfold as the essence of dwelling can be seen as an Epicurean four-part cure to suffering (tetrapharmakos), bringing Heidegger into dialogue with the tradition of philosophical therapy.
20. Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual: Volume > 9
Onur Karamercan The Place-Being of the Clearing and Language: Reading Thomas Sheehan Topologically
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I elucidate Heidegger’s understanding of the “place-being” of the “question of being.” My premises are: 1) Heidegger’s “question of being” can be appropriately made sense of as the “question of language.” 2) The “question of language” requires a topological approach that looks into the link between the place-nature of language and the open-bounded essence of human existence. First, I explain the topological underpinnings of Heidegger’s later thought of being as the clearing and language; second, I examine Sheehan’s phenomenological reading of Heidegger by focusing on the relationship between alētheia and appropriation (Ereignis). In the first section, I explain the correlation between place and language within the context of the “question of being” and display how understanding the former is crucial in having a more complete perspective for the latter. In the second section, I examine Sheehan’s acknowledgment of Heidegger’s idea of place (topos) in his understanding of the nature of human existence in relation to Ereignis, while criticizing the “metaphorical” reading of the “placebeing” of the clearing.