Cover of Radical Philosophy Review
Already a subscriber? - Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Displaying: 1-20 of 696 documents


1. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, Margaret A. McLaren Editorial Note
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
2. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Elisabeth Paquette Autopoietic Systems: Organizing Cellular and Political Spaces
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In Autopoiesis and Cognition (1980), Humberto R. Maturana and Franscico J. Varela state that “the way an autopoietic system maintains its identity depends on its particular way of being autopoietic, that is, on its particular structure, different classes of autopoietic systems have different classes of ontogenies” (98). With this in mind, in this article I develop how this conception of autopoietic systems is both present in, and operates through, Wynter’s employment of space and place, poetry, and wonder.
3. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Cory Wimberly Propaganda and the Nihilism of the Alt-Right
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
The alt-right is an online subculture marked by its devotion to the execution of a racist, misogynistic, and xenophobic politics through trolling, pranking, meme-making, and mass murder. It is this devotion to far-right politics through the discordant conjunction of humor and suicidal violence this article seeks to explain by situating the movement for the first time within its constitutive online relationships. This article adds to the existing literature by viewing the online relationships of the alt-right through the genealogy of propaganda. Through situating the alt-right alongside the genealogy of propaganda, the article offers new insights into the social isolation, increasingly extreme social and political positions, nihilism, and violence that have emerged within the alt-right. The article concludes by applying the lessons of the alt-right for online organizing across the political spectrum and argues that a class-based politics of the left is an important part of countering the rise of the alt-right.
4. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Matt York Imagining New Worlds: Revolutionary Love and Radical Social Transformation in the Twenty-First Century
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
As we witness the collapse of the neoliberal consensus and the subsequent rise of authoritarian ‘strong men’ and xenophobic nationalisms across the globe, the capitalist hegemony that was consolidated by the neoliberal project remains very much intact. In pursuit of a sane alternative to this post-neoliberal world order this article proposes love as a key concept for political theory/philosophy and for performing a central role in the revolutionary transformation of contemporary global capitalism. Through a close reading of the works of Emma Goldman and Michael Hardt, and specifically their own pursuit of a political concept of love—I draw on, and make links with contemporary ideas of love as a political concept for radical social transformation in the twenty-first century. I argue that new love-based political subjectivities, practices, and group formations offer exciting opportunities for a reimagining of the frame within which an alter-globalisation can occur, and link theory to praxis by introducing an ongoing Collective Visioning project which illuminates a new post-capitalist, post-patriarchal, post-colonial and post-anthropocentric synergetic politics grounded in revolutionary love.
review essay
5. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Ann Ferguson Is Eliminating Gender a Transnational Feminist Solution or a Western Imposition?
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
book reviews
6. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Ermanno Castanò Italian Thought and Animality
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
7. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Yuanfang Dai Internationalizing Feminism: The Social Justice Framework
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
8. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Andrew Fiala The Challenge of Developing a Global Ethic
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
9. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Jarno Hietalahti Erich Fromm’s Hopeful Humanism
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
10. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Elís Miller Larsen Ignorance, Empathy, and Resisting Racism
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
11. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Rahul Prasad On Investigation as a Militant Process
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
12. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Charles Reitz Appreciating Marcuse Anew
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
13. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Richard Schmitt Commodification and the Limits of Liberal Equality
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
14. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Sarah Marie Wiebe, Jennifer L. Lawrence Limits of Nature, Limits of Critical Imagination
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
15. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Contributors
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
16. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 24 > Issue: 1
Call for Papers
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
editors' introduction
17. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Reed M. Kurtz, Harry van der Linden Radical Philosophy and Politics Amid the Climate Crisis and the Coronavirus Pandemic
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
articles
18. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Russell Duvernoy, Larry Alan Busk Climate X or Climate Jacobin?: A Critical Exchange on Our Planetary Future
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
In Climate Leviathan, Mann and Wainwright address the political implications of climate change by theorizing four possible planetary futures: Climate Leviathan as capitalist planetary sovereignty, Climate Mao as non-capitalist planetary sovereignty, Climate Behemoth as capitalist non-planetary sovereignty, and Climate X as non-capitalist non-planetary sovereignty. The authors of the present article agree that the depth and scale of destabilizations induced by climate change cannot be navigated justly from within the present social-political-economic system. We disagree, however, on which of the non-capitalist orientations is better suited for generating viable alternatives to the worst dystopian futures. The article thus stages a debate to elucidate the theoretical and political divergence between Climate X and Climate Mao (renamed Climate Jacobin).
19. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Eric Fattor Revolution or Ecocide: Ecological and Environmental Themes in Situationist Thought
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
This article addresses the place of situationist ideas in the current drive to make meaningful social and political change to avoid the catastrophic consequences of climate change. After a brief review of some key situationist concepts, the article shows how situationist thinkers post-1968 saw the prospect of environmental degradation as one of the key consequences of the social apathy induced by the spectacle and the grim prospects for the prevailing liberal assemblage of power to address the problem. The article concludes by briefly discussing the place of a situationist-inspired environmentalism in the larger debates about radical solutions to climate change.
20. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 23 > Issue: 2
Jared Houston Contingency Planning for Severe Climate Change
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
What if we fail to mitigate and adapt to climate change, and so face its more severe impacts? I argue that asking this question reveals a new obligation of climate justice: contingency planning for severe climate change. Surprisingly, such plans are already being drafted. But the politics behind them is neoliberal and militarist. I identify the epistemology of futurity motivating contingency planning—possibilism—and argue that we can and should dissociate it from, and redeploy it against, neoliberal militarism.