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Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association

Volume 91, 2017

Philosophy, Faith, and Modernity

Christopher Tomaszewski
Pages 73-80
DOI: 10.5840/acpaproc2019102397

A Geachian Cure for Morally Paralyzed Skeptical Theists

Skeptical theism is a popular response to the evidential problem of evil, but it has recently been accused of proving too much. If skeptical theism is true, its detractors claim, then we not only have no good reason for thinking that God’s reasons for action should be available to creatures like us, but we also have no good reason for thinking that the reasons which govern how we ought to act should be available to creatures like us. And given this ignorance, we would be morally paralyzed, unable to decide what we ought to do in ordinary situations that call for a moral decision. In this paper, I present a simple solution to this problem of moral paralysis by drawing on Peter Geach’s now famous argument for the attributivity of “good.”

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