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Displaying: 71-80 of 483 documents


new sensibilities and intersections
71. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Wolfgang Leo Maar, Beyond and Within Actual Society: The Dialectics of Power and Liberation
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The materialist approach of One-Dimensional Man emerges in a later work in which Marcuse connects the notion of “new sensibility” to a “complex intermediary function of the intellect.” Revolutionary praxis “is not simply negation but contradiction,” and thus Marcuse’s “new idea of reason” constructs a liberating rationality upon a technological one. This is accomplished by moving from an abstract “concept” of possibility to the perception of possibility as a “social alternative.” Here I examine the “dialectical logic” of human rights, which critiques an unfree world and asserts itself as a political determinant dependent on the rupturing of established power.
72. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Clayton Pierce, Educational Life and Death: Reassessing Marcuse's Critical Theory of Education in the Neoliberal Age
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Drawing upon Herbert Marcuse’s lectures and writings on education, I argue that foundational to his critical theory of education is a biopolitical project calling for the pedagogical production of new human beings under counterrevolutionary types of education. In the second section, I put Marcuse’s biopolitically rethought critical theory of education into conversation with W. E. B. Du Bois’s critique of caste education, as both share the demand for an abolition ethic to be the ontological grounding of the educational subject. Ultimately, I argue an abolition politics needs to be the basis for reimagining education in counterrevolutionary times.
73. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Christopher Holman, Toward a Politics of Nonidentity: Rethinking the Political Philosophy of Herbert Marcuse
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This paper will provide an immanent critique of the political theory of Herbert Marcuse. I argue that Marcuse’s politics are often inadequate when considered from the standpoint of his theory of socialism, the latter being understood as the realization of the negative human capacity for creation in all those fields within which the human being is active. Although Marcuse’s politics often reveals itself as instrumental and managerialist in orientation, I will argue that there nevertheless remains a certain countertendency in his philosophy, one which can be seen as affirming a negative and nonidentitarian politics of overcoming that looks always toward creation.
74. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Nancy J. Hirschmann, Disability, Feminism, and Intersectionability: A Critical Approach
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Critical theorists should turn to disability as an important category of intersectional analysis. I demonstrate this through one type of critical theory—namely, feminism. Disability intersects with all vectors of identity, since disability affects people of all races, ethnicities, religions, genders, sexualities, and classes. Gender and sexuality are particularly illustrative because disability is configured in ways that map onto negative images of femininity (e.g., weakness, dependence). Additionally, the ways in which feminist and disability scholars undertake analysis are complementary. And because these two fields are inherently interdisciplinary, dialogue between them can yield a richer notion of intersectionality within intersectionality.
75. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Nathan Nun, Practical Aesthetics: Community Gardens and the New Sensibility
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This paper argues that community gardens, in addition to being economically practical, offer a promising example of an environment that fosters the new sensibility. After exploring Marcuse’s new sensibility and his critique of aesthetic experience under capitalism, the paper turns to some empirical studies of the benefits of the aesthetic qualities of community gardening. These studies correspond to Marcuse’s proposition that aesthetic environments can play a role in challenging domination. The last section of this paper considers how those involved in the D-Town Farm in Detroit self-consciously assert the community garden as a political project that challenges domination.
76. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Contributors
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77. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 2
Call for Papers: Political Theory and Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration
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78. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Harry van der Linden, A Note from the Editor
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79. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Arnold L. Farr, Douglas Kellner, Andrew T. Lamas, Charles Reitz, Herbert Marcuse's Critical Refusals
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archives
80. Radical Philosophy Review: Volume > 16 > Issue: 1
Jürgen Habermas, Charles Reitz, Herbert Marcuse: Critical Educator for a New Generation--A Personal Reminiscence
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Reflecting on the development of social theory in postwar Germany, Habermas asked, Who better than Germany’s expelled Jewish scholars had something to teach the new nation’s young intellectuals about the dark elements of the all-too-near Nazi past? Habermas’s respect for Adorno, Horkheimer, Löwith, Popper, and others who returned is enormous. Still, he makes clear in this personal letter to Marcuse that it was Marcuse whom he found more exhilarating than any of the others. This he says was due to Marcuse’s critical Marxism, the links he forged between Marx and Freud, and his ability to connect Frankfurt theory to radical praxis against militarism and colonialism.