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Displaying: 71-80 of 1518 documents


articles
71. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Ross Parker, Deep and Wide: A Response to Jeff Jordan on Divine Love
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Recently Jeff Jordan has argued against the view that divine perfection would require God to love every human with equal maximal intensity. He asserts that his argument depends on principles of perfect being theology which he develops and defends. In this paper I argue that Jordan’s case can be better understood as two conceptually distinct arguments, only one of which depends on his proffered principles of perfect being theology. I then critically evaluate each of these arguments, arguing that both are unsuccessful.
book reviews
72. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
William L. Craig, God and Necessity, by Brian Leftow
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73. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Paul Draper, Probability in the Philosophy of Religion, ed. Jake Chandler and Victoria S. Harrison
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74. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Michael Fuerstein, Moral Perception, by Robert Audi
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75. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Timothy J. Pawl, God without Parts: Divine Simplicity and the Metaphysics of God’s Absoluteness, by James E. Dolezal
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76. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Ioanna-Maria Love, God’s Final Victory: A Comparative Philosophical Case for Universalism, by John Kronen and Eric Reitan
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77. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 4
Thomas E. Hill, Jr., Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion, by Jeffrie G. Murphy
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articles
78. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 3
Katherin A. Rogers, The Incarnation As Action Composite
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The Council of Chalcedon insisted that God Incarnate is one person with two natures, one divine and one human. Recently critics have rightly argued that God Incarnate cannot be a composite person. In the present paper I defend a new composite theory using the analogy of a boy playing a video game. The analogy suggests that the Incarnation is God doing something. The Incarnation is what I label an “action composite” and is a state of affairs, constituted by one divine person assuming human nature. This solves a number of puzzles, conforms to Chalcedon, and is logically and metaphysically consistent.
79. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 3
Vincent Wargo, Merleau-Ponty and Sacramental Gesture
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In this article, we utilize Merleau-Ponty’s notions of gesture, flesh and reversibility as philosophical tools to explicate the corporal reality of ritual, incarnation, sacramental presence and the church as the mystical body of Christ. The phenomenological investigation of bodily gesture provides a foundation to elucidate the meaning of symbolic presence from which we compare Merleau-Ponty’s notion of the flesh with that of the patristic fathers, leading finally to its ecclesiological interpretation.
80. Faith and Philosophy: Volume > 30 > Issue: 3
Patrick Todd, John Martin Fischer, The Truth about Foreknowledge
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In this paper we critically evaluate Trenton Merricks’s recent attempt to provide a “new” way of defending compatibilism about divine foreknowledge and human freedom. We take issue with Merricks’s claim that his approach is fundamentally different from Ockhamism. We also seek to highlight the implausibility of Merricks’s rejection of the assumption of the fixity of the past, and we also develop a critique of the Merricks’s crucial notion of “dependence.”