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Displaying: 51-60 of 1701 documents


book reviews
51. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Roger J. H. King, Anthony Karvonen. Politics of Urban Runoff: Nature, Technology, and the Sustainable City
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52. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Robert L. Chapman, William R. Jordon III and George M. Lubick. Making Nature Whole: A History of Ecological Restoration
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53. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Piers H. G. Stephens, Ben A. Minteer. Refounding Environmental Ethics: Pragmatism, Principle, and Practice
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54. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Andrew Biro, Deborah Cook. Adorno on Nature
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55. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Ilan Safit, Simon P. James. The Presence of Nature: A Study in Phenomenology and Environmental Philosophy
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56. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Nancy M. Rourke, Donna Bowman and Clayton Crockett, eds. Cosmology, Ecology, and the Energy of God
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comment
57. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
David Dillard-Wright, In Defense of the Ark of the Possible: A Reply to Chris Nagle
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58. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 2
News and Notes
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59. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 2
Johanna Seibt, From The Guest Editor: Climate Change, Sustainability, and Environmental Ethics
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features
60. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 2
Annick Hedlund-de Witt, Worldviews and Their Significance for the Global Sustainable Development Debate
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Insight into worldviews is essential for approaches aiming to design and support (more) sustainable pathways for society, both locally and globally. However, the nature of worldviews remains controversial, and it is still unclear how the concept can best be operationalized in the context of research and practice. One way may be by developing a framework for the understanding and operationalization worldviews by investigating various conceptualizations of the term in the history of philosophy. Worldviews can be understood as inescapable, overarching systems of meaning and meaning making that to a substantial extent inform how humans interpret, enact, and co-create reality. Moreover, worldviews are profoundly historically and developmentally situated. An Integrative Worldview Framework (IWF) can operationalize worldviews by differentiating five interrelated aspects: ontology, epistemology, axiology, anthropology, and societal vision. The evolution of the worldview concept is suggestive of an increasing reflexivity, creativity, responsibility, and inclusiveness—each of which are qualities that appear to be crucial for the global sustainable development debate.