Already a subscriber? Login here
Not yet a subscriber? - Subscribe here

Browse by:



Displaying: 51-60 of 1716 documents


book reviews
51. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Katie McShane, Anthony O’Hear, ed.: Philosophy and the Environment
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
52. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Todd LeVasseur, Larry Rasmussen: Earth-Honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
53. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Kenneth Worthy, Peter H. Kahn, Jr. and Patricia H. Hasbach, eds. Ecopsychology: Science, Totems, and the Technological Species
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
54. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Leah Kalmanson, William Edeglass et al.: Facing Nature: Levinas and Environmental Thought
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
55. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Robert Kirkman, Ingrid Leman Stefanovic and Stephen Bede Scharper, eds. The Natural City: Re-Envisioning the Built Environment
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
56. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Shan Gao, Yingzi Yang: Ecological Dimension of Ethics: Research on Holmes Rolston, III’s Ideas of Environmental Ethics, and Hong Mei Zhao: AestheticsGone Wild on the Thought of Rolston’s Environmental Aesthetics
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
57. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Referees 2013
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
58. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 35 for 2013
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
59. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
News and Notes
view |  rights & permissions | cited by
features
60. Environmental Ethics: Volume > 35 > Issue: 3
Bryan E. Bannon, From Intrinsic Value to Compassion: A Place-Based Ethic
abstract | view |  rights & permissions | cited by
If the value of intrinsic value accounts lies in the establishment of an impetus to accept duties with respect to nature and to make sense of specific feelings of attachment and affection toward nature, then these goals can be met equally well through the virtue of compassion. Compassion is an other-directed emotion, and is thus not anthropocentric when directed toward nature. It requires us to be capable of relating to and identifying suffering in another. However, basing an ethic on compassion requires a hermeneutic shift in how we think about nature and particular places such that we consider more closely how time is related to suffering. Since suffering is inevitable, there are several ways that compassion might be embodied in our actions, all of which share the feature of promoting the wildness of a place.