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Displaying: 41-50 of 2694 documents


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41. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Chad Carmichael, "Philosophical Logic: An Introduction to Advanced Topics," by George Englebretsen and Charles Sayward
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42. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Donna Engelmann, "Beauty Unlimited," edited by Peg Zeglin Brand
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43. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Liam Harte, "Terrorism: A Philosophical Investigation," by Igor Primoratz
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44. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Richard Polt, "Plato: Republic," translated with an introduction and notes by Christopher Rowe
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45. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Alison Reiheld, "The Philosophical Child," by Jana Mohr Lone
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46. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Aaron Rodriguez, "American Philosophy: The Basics," by Nancy Stanlick
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47. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Matthew Van Cleave, "This is Philosophy: An Introduction," by Steven D. Hales
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48. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 4
Index to Volume 36 (2013)
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articles
49. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
Jana Mohr Lone, Mitchell Green, Philosophy in High Schools: Guest Editors' Introduction to a Special Issue of Teaching Philosophy
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50. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 36 > Issue: 3
James R. Davis, Socrates in Homeroom: A Case Study for Integrating Philosophy across a High School Curriculum
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How should we teach philosophy in high schools? While electives are useful, I advocate going further to integrate philosophy into each traditional subject. High school instructors, working with philosophers, first teach logic as a foundation for asking philosophical questions within their subjects. Students are then encouraged to think about how they reason and what assumptions they are making in each subject. In English, students might consider what makes a novel a work of art; in science, they might explore what it means to call a theory “true.” Unlike an elective model, my approach ensures that all students benefit from philosophy during their secondary education. I conclude the paper with suggestions for implementation.