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Displaying: 21-30 of 2711 documents


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21. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Christopher A. Pynes, Seven Arguments Against Extra Credit
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Overwhelmingly, students desire the opportunity to earn extra credit because they want higher grades, and many professors offer extra credit be­cause they want to motivate students. In this paper, I define the purposes of both grading and extra credit and offer three traditional arguments for making extra credit assignments available. I follow with seven arguments against the use of extra credit that include unnecessary extra work, grade inflation, and ultimately paradox. I finish with an example of a case where extra credit could be justified, although it relies on an important equivocation. Ultimately, I show that extra credit is neither a pedagogically sound nor a conceptually coherent grading practice, and I conclude that extra credit should not be part of the pedagogical toolbox.
22. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Elizabeth Schiltz, How to Teach Comparative Philosophy
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This article articulates a range of possible pedagogical goals for courses in comparative philosophy, and discusses a number of methods and strategies for teaching courses intended to achieve those ends. Ultimately, it argues that the assignment to teach comparative philosophy represents an opportunity to design a course with remarkable freedom and tremendous potential. Comparative philosophy courses can engage students in unique ways that not only increase their understanding of the fundamental assumptions and beliefs of non-Western traditions, but also facilitate the development of the skills and dispositions that enable them to become better philosophers.
review article
23. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Sara Waller, Recent Texts in Animal Ethics
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This is a comparative review of four books for classroom and instructor use: Ethics and Animals, by Lori Gruen; Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals, by Marc Bekoff and Jessica Pierce; Animal Ethics in Con­text, by Clare Palmer; and Anthropocentrism and Its Discontents: The Moral Status of Animals in the History of Western Philosophy, by Gary Steiner. The books range from original scholarship in ethics suitable for the undergraduate and graduate level, to broad historical surveys and analysis of thought about animals in the Western philosophical tradition that could be used as research tools for professors, to books squarely pitched at the undergraduate classroom. Each book is different and worthwhile, and suited to different purposes and student populations.
reviews
24. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Geoffrey Bagwell, "The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics," ed. and trans. George Boys-Stones and Christopher Rowe
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25. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Jeffrey Borrowdale, "First Philosophy: Fundamental Problems and Readings in Philosophy: Knowing and Being," 2nd ed., ed. Andrew Bailey with Robert M. Martin
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26. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Joe Campbell, "Freedom, Responsibility, and Determinism: A Philosophical Dialogue," by John Lemos
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27. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Liam Harte, "Indian Philosophy: An Introduction," by M. Ram Murty
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28. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Nathan Jun, "Globalization and International Development: The Ethical Issues," ed. H. E. Baber and Denise Dimon
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29. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Kenneth G. Lucey, "If A then B: How the World Discovered Logic," by Michael Shenefelt and Heidi White
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30. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Sean Meseroll, "The Nature and Value of Happiness," by Christine Vitrano
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