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Displaying: 21-30 of 32 documents


editorial
21. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Yubraj Aryal, Unoriginal Genius/Conceptual Writing: Recovering Avant-Garde in the Contemporary Poetics
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22. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Johanna Drucker, Stéphane Mallarmé’s Un Coup de Dés and the Poem and/as Book as Diagram
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Modern poetics takes one crucial turn through Ezra Pound’s notion of the “ideogram,” a concept that had a lasting impact through the Imagists andtheir influence. The ideogram borrows from Pound’s ideas about Chinese characters, their ability to condense complex representation into a figuredform in an economic but resonant image. By contrast, the compositional technique embodied in French poet Stéphane Mallarmé’s unique work, UnCoup de Dés, can be characterized as “diagrammatic,” driven by semantic relations expressed spatially in a distributed field. This essay explores thatdiagrammatic work and it implications as a compositional technique.
23. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Sandor Goodhart, “The Self and Other People: Reading Conflict Resolution and Reconciliation with René Girard and Emmanuel Levinas”
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In the interest of moving conflict resolution toward reconciliation, theorists have turned to René Girard whose understanding of scapegoating and imitative desire acquires special importance. But Girardian thinking offers no unique ethical solution, and so theorists have turned to Emmanuel Levinas for such an account. Four ideas especially from Levinas appear helpful: his criticism of totality (and, concomitantly, his substitution of the idea of the infinite); the face as an opening (or gateway) to the infinite; the Other (or other individual) and my infinite (or unlimited) responsibility toward her (or him); and language as the dire as opposed to the dit, the saying (or “to say”) as opposed to the said, as one modality in which this openness to the other individual takes place. Combining Girard’s analysis of the sacrificial with Levinas’s analysis of the ethical may offer conflict resolution theorists an account as thoroughgoing and as old as Biblical scripture, and one to which, in the interest of moving toward reconciliation, they would do well to pay heed.
24. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Paul Redding, Leibniz and Newton on Space, Time and the Trinity
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G. W. Leibniz was a philosopher caught up in both the scientific and theological disputes of his day. Here I argue that a set of common concerns underlay hisengagement within two seemingly very different disputes: that with Newton over the nature of space and time, and that with Socinians over the Christian doctrineof the Trinity.First, Leibniz’s objections to Newton’s conception of space and time were linked to his objection to Newton’s model of the mind with which they was linkedbecause of Newton’s attempt to find support for his notions of absolute space and time by treating them as attributes of an infinitely extended immaterial God.Significantly, Newton had himself been a defender of the anti-trinitarian heresy of Arianism, and Leibniz’s alternative model of mindedness was in turn tied tohis trinitarian theology, as he saw the idea of three persons in one God as providing a model for human self-consciousness in which the identity of thereflecting and reflected upon thinking subject must be maintained. We can see within Leibniz’s triune model of self-consciousness the kernel of laterintersubjective models of human intentionality developed within the period of German Idealism.
25. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Kelly Oliver, Deconstructing “Grown versus Made”: A Derridean Perspective on Cloning
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In this essay, I consider what happens to debates over genetic enhancement when we “deconstruct” the opposition between “grown and made” and the notion of freedom of choice that comes with it. Along with the binary grown and made comes other such oppositions at the center of these debates: chance and choice, accident and deliberation, nature and culture. By deconstructing the oppositions between grown versus made (chance versus choice, or accident versus deliberate), and free versus determined, alternative routes through these bioethical thickets start to emerge.
26. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Darrell Arnold, Hegel and Ecologically Oriented System Theory
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Building on the views of Kant and early nineteenth century life scientists, Hegel develops a view of systems that is a clear precursor to the developments in Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general system theory, as well as the thinking of the ecologically minded system thinkers that built upon the foundation Bertalanffy laid. Hegel describes systems as organic wholes in which the parts respectively serve as means and ends. Further, in the Encyclopedia version of the logic Hegel notes that such systems are comprised of three processes: gestalt, the process of assimilation, and regeneration. In Hegel’s texts, he describes both natural and social systems as organic wholes with such systematic processes. In this paper, these processes and systems are described and it is argued that Hegel quite consistently applies views developed in the logic when describing systems. The paper shows how this parallels later developments in systems theory and goes on to show some distinctions between Hegel’s view of systems and that of later ecologically minded system thinkers.
27. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Robert JC Young, Interventions: Postcolonial, Agency and Resistance
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book reviews
28. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Tammy Lynn Castelein, On Foucault’s Last Philosophical Testament
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29. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Shiva Rijal, Absurd, Parables and Double-Reed Flute
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30. Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry: Volume > 7 > Issue: 16
Dr. Vernon W. Cisney, Toward a Deleuzian Ethics: Value without Transcendence
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