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Displaying: 11-20 of 2711 documents


reviews
11. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Aleksandar Jokic, "Propaganda and the Ethics of Persuasion," 2nd ed., by Randal Marlin
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12. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Todd Jones, "Science, Ethics, and Politics: Conversations and Investigations," ed. Kristen Renwick Monroe
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13. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Ed Kaitz, "The Beautiful Risk of Education," by Gert Biesta
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14. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Deirdre Kelly, Ted Lougheed, "Current Controversies in Philosophy of Mind," ed. Uriah Kriegel
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15. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Dennis Knepp, "Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings," sixth edition, ed. John Perry, Michael Bratman, and John Martin Fischer
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16. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Jim Robinson, "Would You Kill the Fat Man? The Trolley Problem and What Your Answer Tells Us about Right and Wrong," by David Edmonds
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17. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 3
Gina Zavota, Badiou and the Philosophers: Interrogating 1960s French Philosophy," ed. and trans. Tzuchien Tho and Giuseppe Bianco
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articles
18. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Kelly A. Burns, Minimizing and Managing Microaggressions in the Philosophy Classroom
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Dealing with challenging topics like race and gender in the classroom can be a daunting task. Even when we mean well and try hard, we can easily make mistakes that can have serious consequences for our students, especially those in targeted or oppressed groups. Whether or not we explicitly discuss race and gender in our classes, well-meaning professors and students who believe in equality and social justice often commit racist and sexist microaggressions, which are words and actions that, generally unintentionally, convey racist and sexist messages. These microaggressions have a negative impact on students, and impede their learning process. In this paper, I will explain what microaggressions are and why they happen, in order to help prevent them from occurring. I will also examine ways of effectively managing them when they do occur.
19. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Sinclair A. MacRae, The Cooperation Game
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In this paper I explain how to play and administer a game that helps teach students a lesson about the value of cooperation and the role of ethics and the law in obtaining the conditions under which cooperating is reason­able. I also discuss several applications of this Cooperation Game, primarily in courses in social and political philosophy, introductory ethics, and the philosophy of law. The game can usefully be played with a range of groups of students from small tutorial sections to large sections of over one hundred, and the game and post-game analysis can be completed in one or two classes.
20. Teaching Philosophy: Volume > 37 > Issue: 2
Forrest Perry, Corrupting the Youth
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This paper describes a project I have my students do that is based on parallels between the position Socrates describes himself as being in when addressing the charge that he corrupts the youth of Athens and the position critics of capitalism in the U.S. are in when they try to make the case that capitalism is a deeply flawed system that needs to be transformed into some­thing better. For the project, students are asked to give to three audiences of their own choosing a presentation in which they argue against capitalism. The main aim of the project is to help students to appreciate that although the unexamined life may not be worth living, living an examined life can be difficult to do since it can feel a little like dying.