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1. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
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2. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Brian Besong, The Prudent Conscience View
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Moral intuitionism, which claims that some moral seemings confer justification, has become an increasingly popular account in moral epistemology. Defenses of the position have largely focused on the standard account, according to which the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming is determined by its phenomenal credentials alone. Unfortunately, the standard account is less plausible than other versions of moral intuitionism because it does not take etiology seriously. In this paper, I provide an outline and defense of a non-standard account of moral intuitionism that I dub the “Prudent Conscience View.” According to this view, phenomenal credentials only partially determine the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming, for the power of a seeming to confer justification is also determined by its etiology. In brief, a moral seeming confers justification to the degree that the conscience that gave rise to it is functioning properly, and a person’s conscience functions properly to the degree that the person is prudent.
3. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Samuel Kahn, The Interconnection between Willing and Believing for Kant’s and Kantian Ethics
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In this paper I look at the connection between willing and believing for Kant’s and Kantian ethics. I argue that the two main formulations of the categorical imperative are relativized to agents according to their beliefs. I then point out three different ways in which Kant or a present-day Kantian might defend this position. I conclude with some remarks about the contrast between Kant’s legal theory and his ethical theory.
4. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Hili Razinsky, The Behavioral Conflict of Emotion
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This paper understands mental attitudes such as emotions and desires to be dispositions to behavior. It also acknowledges that people are often ambivalent, i.e., that they may hold opposed attitudes towards something or someone. Yet the first position seems to entail that ambivalence is either tantamount to paralysis or a contradictory notion. I identify the problem as based on a reductive interpretation of the dispositional character of attitudes and of ambivalence. The paper instead defends a post-Davidsonian view of the basic rationality of human life. By focussing on desire and emotion we can see that the mutually exclusive ways of life involved in ambivalence are manifested in the person’s conduct.
5. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Dennis Vanden Auweele, For the Love of God: Kant on Grace
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Most philosophers do not read Kant’s philosophy of religion as providing a foundation for Christianity, or even as in line with it. Recently, however, a number of so-called “affirmative Kantians” have argued that Kant’s philosophy of religion explicitly aims at recovering the spirit of Christianity. In this article I scrutinize this claim with regard to Kant’s conceptualization of “grace” as a supplement to his moral theory. Contrary to these “affirmative Kantians,” I argue that Kant’s account of grace stems from Kant’s moral pessimism, not from any sense of the shortcomings of human beings in fulfilling their duties or the religious need for supernatural cooperation. Kant’s concept of grace tries to moderate this pessimism by providing what is needed for the possibility of moral progress. But simply by the way in which Kant regards grace as a rational concept needed for his moral theory, it seems to me that his philosophy of religion runs counter to certain central convictions of Christianity.
6. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Michael R. Slater, Reconsidering James’s Account of Religion
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This essay offers a re-assessment of William James’s methodological approach to religion and his theory of religion. It argues that, despite certain shortcomings, James’s views on these matters are both more complex and more credible than many of his critics allow. It also aims to shed new light on some neglected or poorly understood features of his views on religion.
7. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
John K. O’Connor, Husserl and Carnap: Structural Objectivity, Constitution, Grammar
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This paper situates Husserl’s phenomenology and Carnap’s logical empiricism within a common project—the pursuit of structural objectivity. The rise of empirical psychology and physiology in the late nineteenth century contributed to a view of the self that both thinkers find threatening to the possibility of communication and thus knowledge. With subjectivity presenting the danger of incommunicability, objectivity becomes oriented around communicability. To overcome this threat and to secure an understanding of the possibility of knowledge, each thinker appeals to the formal structures of constitution and logical grammar. In doing so, they help to establish a view of objectivity that responds to contemporary science and is consistent with it. This places Husserl much closer to the birth of modern scientific objectivity than he seems to have realized. Even so, whatever credibility he may have lost in the eyes of historiographers of science should be regained in his stature as philosopher of science.
feature review
8. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Barry David, Theophany: The Neoplatonic Philosophy of Dionysius The Areopagite. By Eric Perl
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book reviews
9. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Gyula Klima, A Treatise of Master Hervaeus Natalis: On Second Intentions. Edited and translated by John P. Doyle
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10. International Philosophical Quarterly: Volume > 54 > Issue: 2
Margaret I. Hughes, The Many Faces of Beauty. Edited by Vittorio Hösle
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