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Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology

Volume 18, Issue 1/2, Winter/Spring 2014
Celling While Driving

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Displaying: 1-10 of 11 documents


1. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Neelke Doorn, Diane Michelfelder, Editorial: Introducing the New Editorial Team
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2. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Galit Wellner, Celling while Driving: Guest Editor's Introduction
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3. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Stacey O. Irwin, Technological Reciprocity with a Cell Phone
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Perception and reciprocity are key understandings in the lived experience of driving while using a cellular phone. When I talk on a cell phone while driving, I interpret the world through a variety of technologically mediated perceptions. I interpret the bumps in the road and the bug on the windshield. I perceive the information on the dashboard and the conversation with the Other on the other end of the technological “line” of the phone. This reflection uses hermeneutical phenomenology to address the things themselves in life with which we relate and interact with in our everydayness, as we talk on a cell phone while driving.
4. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Robert Rosenberger, The Phenomenological Case for Stricter Regulation of Cell Phones and Driving
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The case is made here for stricter regulations on the use of cell phones (both handheld and hands-free) while driving. I review, contextualize, and expand on a phenomenological account of distracted driving that I have developed across a series of papers. This account remains consistent with the empirical literature on the driver distraction of cell phones, but it also offers an alternative theory on why the distraction of cell phone conversation poses such a considerable danger. My argument is that cell phone distraction results from learned perceptual habits, and that breaking these deeply engrained habits is no simple matter.
5. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Galit Wellner, Multi-Attention and the Horcrux Logic: Justifications for Talking on the Cell Phone While Driving
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Attention has been addressed either as a distinction of a figure from background or as a searchlight scanning of a surface. In both ways, attention is limited to a single object. The aim of this article is to suggest a platform for an interpretation of multi-attention, that is, attention based on a multiplicity of objects and spaces. The article describes how attention can be given to more than one object, based on the experiences of pilots, parents and car drivers.
6. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Yoni Van Den Eede, On the (In)compatibility of Driving and Phoning: Ask the Technology
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In this paper I comment on the arguments put forth by Robert Rosenberger and Galit Wellner on the issue of using a mobile phone while driving a car, and I do this by way of a detour through the work of Kevin Kelly and Marshall McLuhan. While Rosenberger and Wellner focus first and foremost on the possibilities and impossibilities within the human organism, I seek to add to the debate the however experimental standpoint of the technologies “themselves.”
7. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Lyat Friedman, Evenly Suspended Distractive Attention
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This article reviews recent cognitive and neurological approaches to the study of attention. It argues that such research is based on the notion that attention has a positive cognitive function selecting, like a sieve or a filter, elements from the background and foreground, to then be processed by the brain and made conscious when required. These approaches fail to explain cognitive overload and recent findings demonstrating that recognition and understanding—sensory, visual and semantic—also occur prior to attention. Merleau-Ponty and Freud offer a different model: a negative distractive attention. Negative distractive attention serves as a threshold for stimuli excluded by neurological processes regulating overload and ensuring that consciousness can concentrate on the singularity of its objects. Such approach to attention explains how one can drive and talk. It is not a positive multi-tasking model but a negative distractive one.
8. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Rob Spicer, Long-Distance Caring Labor: Fatherhood, Smiles, and Affect in the Marketing of the iPhone 4 and FaceTime
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This article is an exploration of Apple’s iPhone 4 as both a technology and an object of marketing. This analysis looks at the FaceTime app and how its marketing created a visual hand-phone-face Deleuzian assemblage while playing on affective connections of parenthood and long-distance caring labor. This is connected to the ways in which mobile telephony creates divided attention between home and labor and the mobile phone and car while driving. This analysis is especially concerned with technological transparency and how it creates divided attention in the home and in the car.
9. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Diane Michelfelder, Driving While Beagleated
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In this contribution to the philosophical debate over distracted driving, I defend the idea that talking on the cell phone while driving is an activity that ought neither to be regulated by public policy means nor addressed by means of automotive safety design features, such as the augmented-reality windshield. I arrive at this conclusion through taking a phenomenologically-influenced look at what an average driver pays attention to during the act of driving an automobile. More specifically, I suggest that if driving while “celling” is taken to involve a single act of attention within a single experience, or taken to involve a “weak” form of multi-attention, a way opens up to see driving while “celling” as being “good” driving.
10. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 1/2
Kirk Besmer, Dis-Placed Travel: On the Use of GPS in Automobiles
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In this paper, I pursue a postphenomenological analysis of navigating with GPS in an automobile. I argue that GPS use is essentially different from navigating with a map insofar as one need not establish nor maintain orientation and directionality. Also, GPS provides a disembodied, omniscient navigational perspective. These aspects stem from the fact that GPS relies on earth-orbiting satellites, thereby reinforcing the modern view of the space/place relation that privileges abstract space over concrete, lived places. Following a postphenomenological thesis that technologies are non-neutral mediators of human experience, I examine some important qualitative aspects of traveling with GPS.