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Displaying: 1-7 of 7 documents


1. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Heather Wiltse, Unpacking Digital Material Mediation
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Digital technologies mediate engagement with the world by making activities visible. The automaticity and physicality of the ways in which they do this suggest that it could be productive to view them as responsive digital materials. This paper explores the structure and function of responsive materials in order to develop a conceptualization of responsive digital materials. It then begins to unpack the complexities of digital material mediation through both drawing on and extending existing postphenomenological theory.
2. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Pedro Xavier Mendonça, Towards a Material Semiotics' Rhetoric: Persuasion and Mobile Technologies
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The aim of this article is to develop the concept of a material semiotics’ rhetoric as a way to highlight a rhetoric that is not reducible to the symbolic and communicational domains, and which helps to shed light on the construction of features for mobile technologies such as cell phones. To reach this goal, this research makes an articulation between some main notions defining rhetoric as a knowledge and practice—being persuasive, seeking to reach an audience, the use of arguments, in a context of ambiguity and problematization—and the construction of technological artefacts according to Science, Technology, and Society studies.
3. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Daniel Compagnon, From Risk Management to Democratic Governance of the Development of Technique: Insights from the Work of Jacques Ellul
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Using the work of Jacques Ellul on technique and its development, this paper criticizes the technological risk management discourse, which claims that risks are “managed” within reasonable limits. In fact, the inevitability of technological change and the uncertainty associated with technology-induced environmental risks, some of which are still totally unknown, undermine the very possibility of democratic governance of risk. Our reliance on technique and the common belief in its infallibility make it particularly arduous to the follow the path showed by Ellul.
4. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Derek Faux, Technology and the Limites of the Information Age circa 2002
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This essay examines three competing views of technological change, developed at the beginning of the millennium, and their impact on our lives. The discussion will lead to three conclusions. First, we must be involved in decisions about how technology is regulated and used. Second, we should be wary not to consider all technologies as having the same effects. The cell phone is neither the personal computer nor the television, and there is no reason to consider each as having the same potential social consequences. Third, new methodologies must be developed to account for any changes in social relations that come about as a result of our adoption of these technologies. In the final section of the essay, the consequences of contemporary technologies on what it means to be human are briefly discussed. Rather than substitute technology for democracy or big data for the ability to find significant information, we must take democratic control of these technologies and affirm our humanity. Indeed, I argue along with noted commentators on technology that what makes us human is our ability to sort and find relevant information, reflect on our actions and take risks in associating with other humans. These are things that we must always bear in mind if we are to flourish in the information age.
5. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Bryan Kibbe, Status Update: Learning to Live with Complexity after "It's Complicated"
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6. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Jeffrey M. Shaw, Machines and Robots: Ethical Considerations
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7. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology: Volume > 18 > Issue: 3
Marty J. Wolf, A Case for Information as a Basis for Ethics
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