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Journal for Peace and Justice Studies

Volume 24, Issue 2, 2014
Peace, Justice, and Education

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Displaying: 1-10 of 11 documents


1. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Connie Titone, Dr. Edward Fierros, Dr. Krista Malott, Matthew Simpson, Gregory LaLuna, Waking from Dysconsciousness: Assessing Racism in Three University Classrooms
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This research provides suggestions for identifying and addressing university students’ perceptions of systemic inequities related to racism and racial privilege.Suggestions are derived from findings of a confirmatory study conducted by the authors in three university classrooms. The project was motivated by theauthors’ on-going commitment to the struggle to eradicate racism and all of its deleterious effects, predicated on the early work of Dr. Joyce King and her conceptof dysconscious racism. The university students’ levels of dysconsciousness regarding systemic inequities related to racism and racial privilege demonstrateddifferences in two of the three categories. Suggestions for increasing student consciousness in the classroom are included.
2. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Jerusha Conner, Katherine Cosner, School Closure as Structural Violence and Stakeholder Resistance as Social Justice
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Although school closure has become an increasingly common reform strategy in urban centers across the country, little research has examined its efficacy. Thisarticle argues that school closure policy imposes a form of structural violence on already oppressed students and perpetuates direct, interpersonal violence inschool settings. In the wake of mass school closures in Philadelphia, we find that schools slated for closure offered safer learning environments than the schoolsto which displaced students were sent, both during the year prior to and the year following closure. At the same time, in the receiving schools, reports of violence significantly increased during the first year of receivership. Despite these dehumanizing conditions, those adversely affected by this policy have organized around alternative legislative options, which hold the promise of disrupting the cycle of oppression and violence that neoliberal school reforms, like school closure, maintain. These policy alternatives represent positive peace and advance equity-oriented, socially just educational change.
3. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Meghan J. Clark, Learning to be in Solidarity with: Vulnerability and Experience Required
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Pope Francis urges us to reject the throwaway culture and instead embrace a culture of solidarity. A primary virtue in Catholic social teaching, solidarityrequires building relationships founded upon equal human dignity, experience and vulnerability are required. This creates certain challenges for teaching andlearning about global solidarity within the confines of a classroom. In this article, I highlight three pedagogical tools I use to create space for experience andvulnerability. Without physically leaving Queens, NY, students begin learning to be in solidarity with others through digitally engaging multiple stories, onlinesimulations, and academic service learning.
4. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Dr. Katerina Standish, Looking for Peace in the English National Curricula
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Does school teach peace? School is a place where we learn values and attitudes - a transmission belt - a social institution that can generate common standards and moral ideals from how we learn (pedagogy) and what we learn (curriculum). This mixed-method analysis utilizes directive (qualitative) and summative (quantitative) content analysis to scrutinize the national curricular statements of England (Early Years Learning and Stage 1-4) to explore whether three elements common in peace education programs appear: recognition of violence (direct, structural or cultural); addressing conflict nonviolently; and, creating the conditions of positive peace. It finds limited evidence in both documents that the English National Curriculum contains content conducive to creating positive peace, minimal content that transmits techniques for transforming conflict nonviolently, and, despite abundant examples of violent acts, there is either norecognition of violence (Stage 1-4) or primarily nominal references to direct violence (Early Learning).
book reviews
5. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Robert A. Duggan, Jr., Neoliberalism’s War on Higher Education by Henry A. Giroux
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6. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
A. Marco Turk, Peacebuilding in Community Colleges: A Teaching Resource; David J. Smith (Ed.)
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7. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Francis A. Galgano, Social Justice, Peace, and Environmental Education: Transformative Standards; Julie Andrzejewski, Marta P. Baltodano, and Linda Symcox(editors)
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8. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Charlotte Jacobs, Framing Peace: Thinking About & Enacting Curriculum as “Radical Hope”; Hans Smits and Rahat Naqvi (editors)
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9. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Katie Clonan-Roy, Urban Youth and School Pushout: Gateways, Get-Aways, and the GED by Eve Tuck
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10. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies: Volume > 24 > Issue: 2
Kelly Rae Kraemer, Aztlán Arizona: Mexican American Educational Empowerment, 1968-1978 by Darius V. Echeverría
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