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The Owl of Minerva

Volume 46, Issue 1/2, 2014/2015

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Displaying: 1-10 of 14 documents


1. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Henry Southgate, The Paradox of Irrationalism: The Logical Foundation of Hegel’s Philosophy of the Absurd
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I resolve a tension in Hegel’s views, which I call the “paradox of irrationalism,” in order to lay the logical foundation of Hegel’s philosophy of the absurd. The paradox is that Hegel both affirms and denies that the world is rational. While critics maintain that this presents a genuine problem for Hegel, I argue Hegel resolves this paradox by showing that reason constitutes itself through the irrational element that it itself grounds. I make my case by investigating the categories of diversity and contingency, which are central to the paradox of irrationalism and Hegel’s account of human agency.
a hegel-marx dialogue for the twenty-first century
2. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Philip J. Kain, Hegel and the Failure of Civil Society
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On what might be called a Marxist reading, Hegel’s analysis of civil society accurately recognizes a necessary tendency toward a polarization of classes and the pauperization of the proletariat, a problem for which Hegel, however, has no solution. Indeed, Marxists think there can be no solution short of eliminating civil society. It is not at all clear that this standard reading is correct. The present paper tries to show how it is plausible to understand Hegel as proposing a solution, one that is similar to that of social democrats, and one that could actually work.
3. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
David Schweickart, Marx's Democratic Critique of Capitalism and Its Implications for a Viable Socialism
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This paper argues that Marx’s critique of capitalism is not, as commonly believed, a critique of the “free market.” I argue that the “market” under capitalism should be understood as a three-fold market—for goods and services, for labor and for capital. I argue that Marx’s critique is essentially a critique of the latter two markets, and not the first. Hence theoretical space opens up for “market socialism.” I proceed to elaborate briefly what specific institutions might comprise an economically viable socialism that would not be vulnerable to Marx’s critique.
4. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Philip J. Kain, Alienation and Market Socialism: Comments on Schweickart's "Marx's Democratic Critique of Capitalism and Its Implications for a Viable Socialism"
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Schweickart and I both discuss market socialism. Neither of us accepts the traditional Marxist view that market economies necessarily produce contradictions that drive them toward collapse. Both of us think the socialist experiments of the twentieth century show that markets cannot successfully be eliminated. Thus, for market socialism, we keep a market and we work to prevent it from producing contradictions, alienation, and collapse. One question that arises here concerns the role of labor unions. Should they (like Hegelian corporations) play a major role in market socialism, or are there respects in which they would obstruct it? There is another important issue that Schweickart should discuss. Market socialism, given its commitment to a market, must face the issue of market generated alienation or fetishism. Can market socialism avoid such problems? And if so how?
5. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Philip T. Grier, In Memoriam: George Louis Kline; March 3, 1921-October 21, 2014
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book reviews
6. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Robert M. Wallace, Giacomo Rinaldi. Absoluter Idealismus und zeitgenössische Philosophie: Bedeutung und Aktualität von Hegels Denken (Absolute Idealism and Contemporary Philosophy: Meaning and Up-to-dateness of Hegel’s Thought)
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7. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
M. A. R. Habib, Andrew Cole. The Birth of Theory
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8. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Kevin Thompson, Ardis B. Collins. Hegel's Phenomenology: The Dialectical Justification of Philosophy's First Principles
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9. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
David Kolb, Klaus Vieweg. Das Denken der Freiheit: Hegels Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts
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10. The Owl of Minerva: Volume > 46 > Issue: 1/2
Gregory M. Collins, Lisa Herzog. Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel, & Political Theory
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